A "worm", a "confusion" and a "glittering" of birds! 9-4-21

September 04, 2021  •  Leave a Comment

Collective nouns for groups of birds can be very descriptive, especially in migration!

 

It began with a "worm" of nearly 30 American Robins, flying into cover in the woods. Small birds seemed to pop out on branches in every level of the canopy, partially hidden by the fully grown leaves. It was a mini-fallout of migrants on Tuesday, 8-31-21 right about 10:30 a.m. They all had "the hangries!" 

 

8-31-21 Blue-winged Warbler on pawpaw (Asimina triloba)8-31-21 Blue-winged Warbler on pawpaw (Asimina triloba) 8-31-21 Black-and-white Warbler8-31-21 Black-and-white Warbler 8-31-21 Magnolia Warbler8-31-21 Magnolia Warbler 8-31-21 Magnolia Warbler8-31-21 Magnolia Warbler 8-31-21 Tennessee and Magnolia Warblers8-31-21 Tennessee and Magnolia Warblers 8-31-21 Magnolia and Black-and-white Warblers8-31-21 Magnolia and Black-and-white Warblers

 

The "confusion" of warblers was soon revealed. A Blue-winged Warbler grabbed a caterpillar from a pawpaw leaf (Asimina triloba). As their hunger subsided a bit, the birds came to the bubbler. Black-and-white, Magnolia, and Tennessee vied for the choicest spot to bathe.

 

8-31-21 Chestnut-sided Warblers8-31-21 Chestnut-sided Warblers 8-31-21 Blackburnian Warbler and American Robin8-31-21 Blackburnian Warbler and American Robin  

 

A pair of Chestnut-sided Warblers got in while birds were also seen at the sump puddle. Robins were there looking for food under the wet leaves and one chased a Blackburnian Warbler out of its way.

 

8-31-21 Nashville Warbler8-31-21 Nashville Warbler

 

A Nashville Warbler was grabbing insects off of Spicebush (Lindera benzoin)

 

8-31-21 Golden-winged Warbler8-31-21 Golden-winged Warbler 8-31-21 Golden-winged Warbler8-31-21 Golden-winged Warbler 8-31-21 Golden-winged Warbler8-31-21 Golden-winged Warbler 8-31-21 Golden-winged Warbler8-31-21 Golden-winged Warbler

 

A female Golden-winged Warbler was very interested in the small bubbler rock in the basin. The contortions it went through to bathe were impressive!

 

8-31-21 Blue-winged and Golden-winged Warblers8-31-21 Blue-winged and Golden-winged Warblers 8-31-21 Blue-winged and Golden-winged Warblers8-31-21 Blue-winged and Golden-winged Warblers

 

The Blue-winged Warbler just had to get in on this action. It's so tempting to put words in their little mouths, but I'll leave it to your imagination!

 

8-31-21 American Redstart8-31-21 American Redstart 8-31-21 American Redstart8-31-21 American Redstart 8-31-21 Canada Warbler8-31-21 Canada Warbler 8-31-21 Canada Warbler8-31-21 Canada Warbler 8-31-21 Baltimore Oriole immature male8-31-21 Baltimore Oriole immature male

 

That day ended with ten warbler species, including an American Redstart and a Canada Warbler. The Canada brought the Bubbler Bird count to 83 for the year. Another interesting bird that came in was an immature Baltimore Oriole. Wish the robins hadn't chased it off so I could have gotten a better image! What a beautiful, bright russet color it was.

 

9-1-21 Black-and-white Warblers9-1-21 Black-and-white Warblers 9-1-21 Magnolia Warbler9-1-21 Magnolia Warbler 9-1-21 Blue-winged Warbler9-1-21 Blue-winged Warbler 9-1-21 Black-throated Green Warbler9-1-21 Black-throated Green Warbler 9-1-21 Black-throated Green Warbler9-1-21 Black-throated Green Warbler

 

September began with four warbler species on the first. Black-and-white, Magnolias and Blue-winged Warblers were still here. A Black-throated Green Warbler was another FOS (first of season) bird.

 

8-31-21 Ruby-throated Hummingbird8-31-21 Ruby-throated Hummingbird

 

One cannot speak of migration without some mention of the "glittering" of hummingbirds we've all been seeing! Keep those feeders clean and filled. They need the energy to catch tiny insects and put on some weight. 

 

9-3-21 Eastern Bluebird immature male9-3-21 Eastern Bluebird immature male 9-3-21 Eastern Bluebird immature male9-3-21 Eastern Bluebird immature male

Last but certainly not least, a scruffy, immature Eastern Bluebird had been feeding in the canopy and came to check out the Bubbler yesterday morning. We're glad to know that our restored habitat is supporting this species. Many bluebirds were lost in that last hard freeze in April throughout Missouri. I had seen two young birds in late July, so this bird may be from a second brood, its yellow gape is still visible. 

 

Enjoy the new season!

 Need a review?  Fall Warbler Species

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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