Ruby-throated Hummingbird on garden arborRuby-throated Hummingbird on garden arborOne of many ruby-throated hummingbirds in our garden rests on the garden arbor.

Welcome to our blog! It's all about our discoveries here in our Shady Oaks yard, a Sanctuary for birds and other wildlife. We began to restore habitat for wildlife here in 1996 and gauge our success by the diversity of species we observe and document with our photography. We hope you enjoy our images and come back often to see what's new! 

More birds of May 5-17-22

May 17, 2022  •  Leave a Comment

May, oh my!

So many birds = so little time

 

Today, we start with a video. Fortunately, I saw this bird and could confirm its identity. That will be revealed in due course. So, watch for the bird on the left side on the down-angled branch. It disappears into cover and comes into the basin area 'back door' on the left side. As you can see, these birds are small, quick and it's often difficult to catch sight of them when the leaves have filled out and the bubbler area is so dark and shady. 

 

5-16-22 Mourning WarblerMourning Warbler bathes in the basin.

 

4-28-22 Warbling Vireo4-28-22 Warbling Vireo 5-11-22 Philadelphia Vireo5-11-22 Philadelphia Vireo 5-11-22 Blue-headed Vireo5-11-22 Blue-headed Vireo 5-10-22 Red-eyed Vireo5-10-22 Red-eyed Vireo

 

Four different vireo species have come to the bubbler, usually to splash-bathe. They pause to look, giving me a better chance to get their passport photos. Warbling Vireo and Philadelphia Vireos look similar and are often difficult to separate out. The Philadelphia is the least common. Blue-headed Vireo and Red-eyed Vireo are a bit easier to tell apart.

  5-10-22 Baltimore Oriole5-10-22 Baltimore Oriole
5-11-22 FOY Orchard Oriole5-11-22 FOY Orchard Oriole

 

Both Baltimore and Orchard Orioles have come to the bubbler this spring. It is the first time that a male Orchard has gotten in to bathe.

 

5-7-22 Summer Tanager, immature5-7-22 Summer Tanager, immature 5-4-22 Scarlet Tanager5-4-22 Scarlet Tanager

 

Summer and Scarlet Tanagers have also been seen and heard. The young Summer Tanager reminds me of Neopolitan sherbet with its multicolored plumage. Soon, it will be an orangey-red all over.

 

5-8-22 Gray-cheeked Thrush5-8-22 Gray-cheeked Thrush 5-8-22 Swainson's Thrush5-8-22 Swainson's Thrush 5-3-22 Wood Thrush, first time in 10 years at the bubbler!5-3-22 Wood Thrush, first time in 10 years at the bubbler!

 

Gray-cheeked and Swainson's Thrushes come early and often to the bubbler. However, one evening this spring was the first time in ten years that a Wood Thrush got in! Now let's look at a few more warblers.

 

5-2-22 Yellow Warbler5-2-22 Yellow Warbler

5-9-22 Yellow Warbler female5-9-22 Yellow Warbler female

 

Yellow Warblers have been a joy to see this year, and a female came in on Monday, 5-9-22.


5-4-22 Northern Parula5-4-22 Northern Parula

 

We had Northern Parulas a few more days before they began to establish breeding territory. 

 

5-9-22 FOY Bay-breasted Warbler5-9-22 FOY Bay-breasted Warbler 5-11-22 Bay-breasted Warbler female5-11-22 Bay-breasted Warbler female

 

The lovely Bay-breasted Warbler pair arrived on different days. Both are so uniquely colored, though the female can be confused with the Blackpoll female. Dark legs? Bay-breasted. 

 

5-9-22 Blackpoll Warbler5-9-22 Blackpoll Warbler 5-1-22 Blackpoll Warbler female5-1-22 Blackpoll Warbler female

 

And, here is the Blackpoll pair. Certainly don't have dark legs, do they? Orangey legs are a key diagnostic feature for this bird.

 

  5-12-22 Blackburnian Warbler5-12-22 Blackburnian Warbler

5-9-22 Blackburnian Warbler female5-9-22 Blackburnian Warbler female

 

What would spring be without the beautiful Blackburnian Warblers? Firethroats!

 

5-16-22 FOY Mourning Warbler5-16-22 FOY Mourning Warbler
5-16-22 FOY Mourning Warbler5-16-22 FOY Mourning Warbler
 

The video of the first bird was recorded on Friday, 5-16-22. I was able to find the bird in the hydrangeas behind the bubbler. It gave me one full frontal view, Mourning Warbler! Then, it flew down into cover again to forage and sang a little, "cheery-cheery, chorry-chorry-chorry." I had a long list of other things to be done, but thought there might be a good chance that the bird would come back after feeding. It is a skulker, and stayed in the cover of mayapple and wood poppies most of the time, but I was able to get these two photos, certainly not glamour shots but, "C'est la vie!" It is #109 for the year and #78 at the bubbler. To me, having it be comfortable enough to come back in was reward in itself. Every minute a bird is here finding what it needs helps to anchor our location into its genes.

 

All the photos that make it into a gallery or on the blog go through my 12-step process. I've taken hundreds every day this spring and I'm still sorting through them. Maybe I'll be caught up by fall migration!

If you'd like to look at more of the birds, start here:  Photos beginning May 4

 

Update:  The Eastern Bluebirds fledged successfully on 5-12-22. We hope to see more of them soon!

 

 

 

 

 


First week of May, 5-8-22

May 08, 2022  •  Leave a Comment

Happy Mother's Day!

How about some warblers to help celebrate?

 

5-1-22 Yellow Warbler5-1-22 Yellow Warbler

4-30-22 Yellow Warbler4-30-22 Yellow Warbler 4-30-22 Yellow Warbler with a caterpillar!4-30-22 Yellow Warbler with a caterpillar!

 

"Sweet, sweet, sweet, I'm so sweet!" There have been Yellow Warblers here almost every day since 4-22-22, Earth Day! Some years we don't see them at all. 

  4-29-22 Pine Warbler4-29-22 Pine Warbler 4-30-22 Pine Warbler4-30-22 Pine Warbler

 

An unusual sighting is this Pine Warbler that was here for several days. It is a rare but regular migrant through the St. Louis area during the last two weeks of April and first few days of May. There is a wintering population in shortleaf pine stands in the southern part of Missouri. 

 

4-28-22 Blackpoll Warbler4-28-22 Blackpoll Warbler 5-1-22 Blackpoll Warbler female5-1-22 Blackpoll Warbler female

 

Blackpoll Warblers! Orange legs are diagnostic for the species. Male is in first photo, and the most beautiful female I've ever seen in the second.  It's important to see this species in the spring because there are very few records of them in the fall. In fact, we have the third record of a fall sighting for the state. 

 

4-29-22 Chestnut-sided Warbler4-29-22 Chestnut-sided Warbler 4-29-22 Chestnut-sided Warbler4-29-22 Chestnut-sided Warbler

 

Chestnut-sided Warblers have been heard calling, "Pleased, pleased, pleased to meet 'ya!"

 

4-30-22 Blue-winged Warbler4-30-22 Blue-winged Warbler 4-30-22 Blue-winged Warbler4-30-22 Blue-winged Warbler

 

Blue-winged Warblers! "Bee-buzz!" What a beauty to be blowing raspberries, but that is just what it sounds like.

 

5-2-22 Golden-winged Warbler5-2-22 Golden-winged Warbler 5-1-22 Golden-winged Warbler5-1-22 Golden-winged Warbler 5-1-22 Golden-winged Warbler5-1-22 Golden-winged Warbler
 

"Zee-bee-bee-bee bee!" sings the Golden-winged Warbler, the bird of highest conservation concern that we've seen here.

 

5-1-22 Northern Parula5-1-22 Northern Parula 5-2-22 Northern Parula5-2-22 Northern Parula 5-2-22 Northern Parula5-2-22 Northern Parula

 

"Zeeee-up!" The diminutive Northern Parula can easily be heard, not always easily seen. It took years to coax them down to the bubbler.

 

4-30-22 Black-and-white Warbler4-30-22 Black-and-white Warbler 4-30-22 Black-and-white Warbler4-30-22 Black-and-white Warbler 4-30-22 Black-and-white Warbler4-30-22 Black-and-white Warbler

 

"Weesee, weesee, weesee, weesee, weesee." The Black-and-white Warbler has a repetitive, rhythmic squeaky song. 

 

5-3-22 FOY Magnolia Warbler5-3-22 FOY Magnolia Warbler 5-3-22 FOY Magnolia Warbler, "tail dipped in ink"5-3-22 FOY Magnolia Warbler, "tail dipped in ink" 5-3-22 FOY Magnolia Warbler5-3-22 FOY Magnolia Warbler

 

The brilliant Magnolia Warbler sings, "Weeta-weeta-weetsee". Its tail looks like it's dipped in ink and like no other warbler's.

 

4-29-22 Northern Waterthrush4-29-22 Northern Waterthrush 4-29-22 Northern Waterthrush4-29-22 Northern Waterthrush

 

The Northern Waterthrush loves the still waters of the swampy thicket. It has a loud metallic "chink" call, and sings, "Sweet sweet sweet swee wee wee chew chew chew." 

 

5-1-22 Black-throated Green Warbler5-1-22 Black-throated Green Warbler
5-1-22 Black-throated Green Warbler5-1-22 Black-throated Green Warbler 5-1-22 Black-throated Green Warbler5-1-22 Black-throated Green Warbler

 

The Black-throated Green Warbler has two songs, "zee-zee-zee-zee-zoozee!" and "zee-zee-zoo-zoo-zee." It's fun to hear all these songs tumbling on top of one another. In May, it is challenging to keep up with all the activity! 

 

Birds will be tumbling in now, in even greater numbers. Here's the forecast:   http://birdcast.info/

 

For all the birds since the last post:  Birds beginning 5-28-22

 

Just warblers, you say?   Warblers

 

 

Enjoy the miracle of migration!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Migrants are on the move! 4-30-22

April 30, 2022  •  Leave a Comment

 

Migration is now in full swing!

What a big change in the last ten days. Here are just some of the new FOY (first-of-year) birds.

 

4-19-22 Rusty Blackbird4-19-22 Rusty Blackbird

 

The last Rusty Blackbird was seen on Earth Day, 4-22-22. There are still a few being seen in Forest Park, very late for this overwintering  species still to be here. 

 

4-21-22 Blue-headed Vireo4-21-22 Blue-headed Vireo

 

This Blue-headed Vireo splash-bathed on 4-21-22.

 

4-22-22 FOY #62 *42 Black-throated Green Warbler4-22-22 FOY #62 *42 Black-throated Green Warbler 4-22-22 FOY #64 *43 Orange-crowned Warbler4-22-22 FOY #64 *43 Orange-crowned Warbler

4-23-22 Orange-crowned Warbler in cover of Blackhaw out of the wind4-23-22 Orange-crowned Warbler in cover of Blackhaw out of the wind

 

Black-throated Green and Orange-crowned Warblers came in on Earth Day. The second Orange-crowned Warbler was sheltering in a Blackhaw, out of gusty winds the following day.

  4-22-22 FOY 65 *44 Yellow Warbler4-22-22 FOY 65 *44 Yellow Warbler

 

A Yellow Warbler stopped by the bubbler on Earth Day. This species has been seen on three days, more photos will be added soon (if I ever catch up!) 

 

4-22-22 FOY Indigo Bunting4-22-22 FOY Indigo Bunting

 

To complement the Yellow Warbler, and Indigo Bunting also came in for species #66 for the year and #45 at the bubbler.

  4-23-22 FOY 70 Ruby-throated Hummingbird4-23-22 FOY 70 Ruby-throated Hummingbird

4-23-22 FOY 70 Ruby-throated Hummingbird at Virginia Bluebells4-23-22 FOY 70 Ruby-throated Hummingbird at Virginia Bluebells

 

Finally, our first Ruby-throated Hummingbird arrived on Saturday, 4-23-22. This bird was at the Virginia Bluebells even more than the feeder. I saw the first female yesterday, 4-29-22.
 

4-23-22 FOY 73 *49 Northern Parula4-23-22 FOY 73 *49 Northern Parula 4-25-22 Northern Parula female4-25-22 Northern Parula female 4-25-22 Northern Parula female4-25-22 Northern Parula female

 

Beautiful Northern Parulas came in on Saturday, 4-23-22 as well. The female shows us all what these birds are doing, finding caterpillars on native plants to eat! This is exactly why we do not use pesticides because that would eliminate this essential food for these migrants and for nesting birds. Caterpillars are the primary food fed to baby birds.

 

4-23-22 Nashville Warbler4-23-22 Nashville Warbler 4-24-22 Tennessee Warbler4-24-22 Tennessee Warbler 4-24-22 FOY Blackpoll Warbler4-24-22 FOY Blackpoll Warbler

4-24-22 FOY Blackpoll and Tennessee, Nashville Warblers4-24-22 FOY Blackpoll and Tennessee, Nashville Warblers

 

Nashville, Tennessee and Blackpoll Warblers, you guessed them! "Parties at the Bubbler" have officially begun!

 

4-25-22 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher4-25-22 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 4-25-22 FOY Lincoln's Sparrow4-25-22 FOY Lincoln's Sparrow 4-26-22 FOY Wild Turkey4-26-22 FOY Wild Turkey

 

From the tiny Blue-gray Gnatcatcher and shy Lincoln's Sparrow to the Wild Turkey that stepped out of the woods before scooting back to cover, birds of every size have been coming through. It's spring migration!

 

4-26-22 FOY Rose-breasted Grosbeak female4-26-22 FOY Rose-breasted Grosbeak female

4-26-22 FOY Golden-winged Warbler4-26-22 FOY Golden-winged Warbler
4-26-22 FOY Great Crested Flycatcher4-26-22 FOY Great Crested Flycatcher

 

Rose-breasted Grosbeaks, Golden-winged Warblers and the Great Crested Flycatchers have been added to the mix.

 

4-25-22 Red-headed Woodpecker4-25-22 Red-headed Woodpecker

4-27-22 Red-headed Woodpecker4-27-22 Red-headed Woodpecker

4-26-22 Red-headed Woodpecker4-26-22 Red-headed Woodpecker

 

For the first time ever, we have TWO Red-headed Woodpeckers frequenting the woodland. They both are seen and heard every day now since Monday, 4-25-22. The first photo shows the near adult bird and the next two show an adult. Perhaps they are a pair now. This species is on the Watch List due to habitat loss, so this is a remarkable development. With the leaves filling out on the trees, it may be trickier to see and photograph these birds. Will try to keep you updated.

 

Carolina Wrens and House Finches have fledged. Northern Cardinals, Eastern Phoebes, Eastern Bluebirds and more are feeding young. Yesterday, I had 56 species of birds here, including 14 warblers. It will take me a while to catch up, but photos will be added into this gallery. 

 

It's truly spring!

 

Birds since 4-17-22

 

PS  Some of you have asked about the highly contagious Avian Flu situation for the birds in other states. I'll post an alert if we need to take down feeders and bird baths. At this point, it is not necessary as far as I know.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Mid-April updates 4-17-22

April 17, 2022  •  Leave a Comment

 

The moody month of April is now under the full Pink Moon.

 

4-7-22 Purple Finch female4-7-22 Purple Finch female 4-7-22 Purple Finch female4-7-22 Purple Finch female

 

A female Purple Finch was seen on a couple days and visited the bubbler on 4-7-22.

  4-7-22 Hermit Thrush with pupa4-7-22 Hermit Thrush with pupa

 

Two Hermit Thrushes were also here chasing each other and finding tiny larvae to eat.

 

4-8-22 American Goldfinch on Blackhaw (Viburnum prunifolium)4-8-22 American Goldfinch on Blackhaw (Viburnum prunifolium) 4-8-22 American Goldfinch on Spicebush4-8-22 American Goldfinch on Spicebush 4-8-22 American Goldfinches4-8-22 American Goldfinches

4-8-22 Virginia Bluebells in light snow4-8-22 Virginia Bluebells in light snow

 

We had a setback with sleet and light snow when a cold front came in on 4-8-22. The next morning, we had a hard freeze. Birds need to find food no matter what the weather! Somehow, dark days make the goldfinches all the brighter.

 


4-9-22 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker on Green Ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica)4-9-22 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker on Green Ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica) 4-9-22 Hairy Woodpecker4-9-22 Hairy Woodpecker

 

A Yellow-bellied Sapsucker and a Hairy Woodpecker found insects by pecking away at a Green Ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica) and small stump.

 

4-9-22 Red-breasted Nuthatch with insect4-9-22 Red-breasted Nuthatch with insect
4-9-22 Yellow-rumped Warbler with insects4-9-22 Yellow-rumped Warbler with insects 4-12-22 Eastern Phoebe4-12-22 Eastern Phoebe 4-12-22 Eastern Phoebe caught insect in 30 mph gust4-12-22 Eastern Phoebe caught insect in 30 mph gust

 

Red-breasted Nuthatches glean insects from vines and bark. The Yellow-rumped Warbler also does but along with the Eastern Phoebe, a flycatcher, it will sally out and catch insects on the wing.

 

4-10-22 Ruby-crowned Kinglet4-10-22 Ruby-crowned Kinglet 4-12-22 Ruby-crowned Kinglet4-12-22 Ruby-crowned Kinglet 4-12-22 Carolina Chickadee4-12-22 Carolina Chickadee 4-12-22 Yellow-rumped Warbler4-12-22 Yellow-rumped Warbler 4-12-22 White-breasted Nuthatch4-12-22 White-breasted Nuthatch

 

Bathing is a favorite activity even on the coldest days. A Ruby-crowned Kinglet checked the bubbler when it was full of wind-blown leaves and returned the following morning. The Carolina Chickadee, Yellow-rumped Warbler and White-breasted Nuthatch always find a time to  freshen up.


4-13-22 Red-headed Woodpecker juvenile, near adult plumage4-13-22 Red-headed Woodpecker juvenile, near adult plumage 4-13-22 Red-headed Woodpecker juvenile, near adult plumage4-13-22 Red-headed Woodpecker juvenile, near adult plumage 4-13-22 Red-headed Woodpecker juvenile, near adult plumage4-13-22 Red-headed Woodpecker juvenile, near adult plumage

4-13-22 Red-headed Woodpecker juvenile, near adult plumage4-13-22 Red-headed Woodpecker juvenile, near adult plumage

1-27-22 Red-headed Woodpecker Juvenile1-27-22 Red-headed Woodpecker Juvenile

 

I was filling the feeders one morning when I heard a scuffle and looked up to see a Red-headed Woodpecker and Yellow-bellied Sapsucker having a bit of a confrontation. Four days later on 4-13-22, I was able to find the Red-headed Woodpecker again in the woodland. What a striking bird! Because it has dark barring in the secondary feathers and they're not pure white, it is a young bird in near adult plumage. I wonder, is it the same juvenile bird that was here in January? (last photo)

 

4-13-22 FOY #56 White-eyed Vireo4-13-22 FOY #56 White-eyed Vireo 4-15-22 FOY #57 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher4-15-22 FOY #57 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 4-16-22 FOY#58 B#40 Swainson's Thrush4-16-22 FOY#58 B#40 Swainson's Thrush

 

We've seen three new arrivals for the year. In between storms on 4-13-22, I spotted this bedraggled little White-eyed Vireo for FOY #56. Two days later, the Blue-gray Gnatcatcher was confirmed. (Thought I'd had a glimpse when I saw the vireo.) And, yesterday, this Swainson's Thrush popped out of the bluebells at the bubbler for FOY #58 and Bubbler Bird #40.

 

4-15-22 Brown Thrasher4-15-22 Brown Thrasher
4-15-22 Brown Thrasher4-15-22 Brown Thrasher 4-15-22 Brown Thrasher4-15-22 Brown Thrasher

 

Remember in the last post, I mentioned my little nemesis, the Brown Thrasher. Well, I have to take that back. It came out on Friday to give me a real education on how it thrashes about in the leaves to find food and lives up to its name. Of course, haven't seen it since! Some days it's all about luck and being in the right place at the right time.

 

4-12-22 Five Eastern Bluebird eggs! Found at 3:52 pm4-12-22 Five Eastern Bluebird eggs! Found at 3:52 pm

 

We checked the Eastern Bluebird nest on 4-12-22 and found five beautiful eggs. The female is diligent about being on the nest and the male takes his guard duty very seriously. Fingers crossed they'll be successful. 

 

Recently, I was asked why we have so many beautiful birds here in our yard. We became aware years ago that birds were in trouble. My birding mentors told me stories of birds literally, "dripping off the trees." Well, birds are in trouble and their numbers have dropped dramatically since 1970. Birds are the "canaries in the coal mine", that means they are indicators of environmental health. If you are interested in helping birds and more, here are some things that you can do, right in your own yard.

 

 

Together, we can make a huge difference for our native birds, butterflies and bees! 

 

To view all the photos taken since 4-7-22, begin here:  Mid-April

 

 

 


Into April now 4-7-22

April 07, 2022  •  1 Comment

 

New arrivals and nesting birds are being seen.

 

3-28-22 FOY #50 Purple Finch3-28-22 FOY #50 Purple Finch 3-28-22 FOY #50 Purple Finch with House Finch in front3-28-22 FOY #50 Purple Finch with House Finch in front

 

Our FOY #50 Purple Finch was seen on 3-28-22. This male was here just one day. In the tray feeder, it's easy to see the differences between the House Finch in front and the Purple Finch behind. The House Finch is orangier and smaller with striations on its flanks.

 

3-31-22 FOY #52 Swamp Sparrow3-31-22 FOY #52 Swamp Sparrow 3-31-22 FOY #52 Swamp Sparrow3-31-22 FOY #52 Swamp Sparrow

 

A bird that we missed last year showed up on 3-31-22, a Swamp Sparrow, FOY #52. Another bird had shown up earlier that day, a Brown Thrasher for #51. Though seen several times, it has eluded my efforts to photograph it. 

 

3-28-22 American Goldfinches face off3-28-22 American Goldfinches face off

3-28-22 American Goldfinches determine who's boss3-28-22 American Goldfinches determine who's boss

4-3-22 American Goldfinch4-3-22 American Goldfinch

 

Many male birds are getting pretty testy with each other. Robins, sparrows and these American Goldfinches dramatically display the pecking order! Breeding is serious business and finding the best places to attract a mate and procreate is what Spring is all about for birds.

 

3-28-22 Yellow-rumped Warbler female3-28-22 Yellow-rumped Warbler female 3-29-22 Yellow-rumped Warbler in molt3-29-22 Yellow-rumped Warbler in molt

3-28-22 Yellow-rumped Warbler in Spicebush3-28-22 Yellow-rumped Warbler in Spicebush 4-2-22 Yellow-rumped Warbler with insect4-2-22 Yellow-rumped Warbler with insect

4-4-22 Yellow-rumped Warbler in Spicebush (Lindera benzoin)4-4-22 Yellow-rumped Warbler in Spicebush (Lindera benzoin)

 

Yellow-rumped Warblers have been surviving on bark butter, peanut crumbs, suet and flying insects on warm days. The male in full breeding plumage caught a tiny mason bee while it was pollinating spicebush (Lindera benzoin). This is the first time I've documented that behavior.

 

4-2-22 Chipping Sparrow4-2-22 Chipping Sparrow
 

Another new arrival was a little Chipping Sparrow FOY#53 on 4-1-22.  It was here for two days before moving on.

 

4-4-22 Swamp Sparrow4-4-22 Swamp Sparrow
 

I found the Swamp Sparrow again, in the swamp of course, on 4-4-22.
 

4-3-22 Rusty Blackbird4-3-22 Rusty Blackbird

4-5-22 450+ Rusty Blackbirds4-5-22 450+ Rusty Blackbirds
 

We have seen large flocks of Rusty Blackbirds come in to forage in the leaves throughout the yard and especially in the swampy woods. It can be really challenging to begin to show how many there are, they're so camouflaged. On Tuesday, there was a very large flock here and when I left to go vote, they flushed and started to move east and then north out of our yard and into our neighbors' yards. I drove very slowly to photograph the birds with my phone. I enlarged the photos and counted the birds, there were over 450! Add in another 150 or so that had moved up into the canopy, and well, at least 600 birds were here in the neighborhood. This species is listed as Vulnerable. We are lucky to see them and try not to disturb them so they can feed on insects in the leaves. I suspect they moved back into our yard after I left.

 

 

4-3-22 Eastern Bluebirds4-3-22 Eastern Bluebirds 4-3-22 Eastern Bluebirds4-3-22 Eastern Bluebirds 4-3-22 Eastern Bluebirds -Day nine4-3-22 Eastern Bluebirds -Day nine
 

The pair of Eastern Bluebirds has been very busy building their nest. They both seem to be micromanaging this joint operation! They were still working on finishing touches this morning.

 

4-4-22 Eastern Phoebe4-4-22 Eastern Phoebe

 

The pair of Eastern Phoebes have been at work as well. We've seen the female gathering nesting material while the male calls away.

 

4-6-22 FOY#55 Hermit Thrush first seen on 4-4-224-6-22 FOY#55 Hermit Thrush first seen on 4-4-22 4-6-22 FOY#55 Hermit Thrush first seen on 4-4-224-6-22 FOY#55 Hermit Thrush first seen on 4-4-22 4-6-22 FOY#55 Hermit Thrush first seen on 4-4-224-6-22 FOY#55 Hermit Thrush first seen on 4-4-22

 

On 4-4-22, a Great Blue Heron flew over for FOY #54 and a bit later I spotted our FOY #55 Hermit Thrush. It has a distinctive way of moving along quickly, then stops and flicks its tail up, then lowers it slowly. 

 

4-1-22 Red-breasted Nuthatch4-1-22 Red-breasted Nuthatch 4-5-22 Red-breasted Nuthatch4-5-22 Red-breasted Nuthatch

 

Red-breasted Nuthatches are still around, sometimes I see two males and a female. The two males are pictured here, the second one lighter than the first.

 

4-1-22 Brown Creeper4-1-22 Brown Creeper

 

Brown Creepers are still foraging on the trees, sometimes on oaks, cherries or maples.  

 

4-4-22 First bloom of Virginia Bluebells4-4-22 First bloom of Virginia Bluebells

 

Well, it's time to get those hummingbird feeders cleaned up and ready to go. Ruby-throated Hummingbirds will be coming in soon, along with warblers ready to refuel from their long hauls, too. It has been cool and somewhat slow, but Spring is springing!

 

 

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