Ruby-throated Hummingbird on garden arborRuby-throated Hummingbird on garden arborOne of many ruby-throated hummingbirds in our garden rests on the garden arbor.

Welcome to our blog! It's all about our discoveries here in our Shady Oaks yard, a Sanctuary for birds and other wildlife. We began to restore habitat for wildlife here in 1996 and gauge our success by the diversity of species we observe and document with our photography. We hope you enjoy our images and come back often to see what's new! 

Ups and Downs through Leap Day 3/1/24

March 01, 2024  •  2 Comments

We have gained almost two hours of daylight since the Winter Solstice.

Spring is on its way and that means ups and downs, in temperature and moisture.

 

2-20-24 Yellow-rumped Warbler2-20-24 Yellow-rumped Warbler 2-20-24 Yellow-rumped Warbler2-20-24 Yellow-rumped Warbler

2-21-24 Yellow-rumped Warbler2-21-24 Yellow-rumped Warbler
 

A Yellow-rumnped Warbler has been residing here in our woodland. On warmer days, it has been seen sipping sap at the sapsucker wells on the Sugar Maple by the pond. Then, it will sally out to catch insects and land in nearby shrubs. Conditions have been very dry, and it is often seen at the bubbler.

 

2-20-24 Eastern Bluebird pair checks nest box2-20-24 Eastern Bluebird pair checks nest box 2-20-24 Eastern Bluebird pair checks nest box2-20-24 Eastern Bluebird pair checks nest box 2-20-24 Eastern Bluebird pair checks nest box2-20-24 Eastern Bluebird pair checks nest box

The bluebird nest box went up at noon on 2/20/24. This pair of Eastern Bluebirds are pretty excited about their prospects! Nest building should begin soon, the pair were seen mating Wednesday, 2/28/24. 

 

2-26-24 Cooper's Hawk2-26-24 Cooper's Hawk 2-27-24 Cooper's Hawk2-27-24 Cooper's Hawk 2-27-24 Cooper's Hawk2-27-24 Cooper's Hawk

A Cooper's Hawk was seen on a warm afternoon, Monday 2/26/24 when it reached 78.1 degrees. The next day would be the warmest yet, and the hawk returned to take a long and leisurely bath in the stream bed. It was totally drenched and used this perch in the Bald Cypress to shake and dry its feathers.

Red flag warnings were up both Monday and Tuesday. When I walked through the east beds to look at plants, the leaves were crispy under my feet. These were dangerous conditions, extremely dry and windy. Birds were thirsty!

 

2-27-24 Tufted Titmouse2-27-24 Tufted Titmouse 2-27-24 Red-bellied Woodpecker2-27-24 Red-bellied Woodpecker 2-27-24 Downy Woodpecker2-27-24 Downy Woodpecker

Birds like this Tufted Titmouse were at the bird bath frequently. Red-bellied and Downy Woodpeckers, Carolina Chickadees and more kept up a steady parade at the bubbler, mainly to drink.

 

2-27-24 Mourning Dove2-27-24 Mourning Dove 2-27-24 Yellow-rumped Warbler2-27-24 Yellow-rumped Warbler 2-27-24 Eastern Bluebird2-27-24 Eastern Bluebird

The drying, gusty winds kept the birds low in the landscape, nervous about hawks and continually taking chances to drink. Mourning Doves, the Yellow-rumped Warbler and Eastern Bluebirds were just a few of the many to stop by. 

 

Around 1:30 pm, I stepped out to talk with Dan and immediately heard the first Pine Warbler of the year. Hope it will come in closer!

 


The high on Tuesday 2/27/24 was 83.9 degrees! By Wednesday morning, the temperature had plunged nearly 60 degrees to 24.6 degrees.

 

2-28-24 White-throated Sparrow, white form2-28-24 White-throated Sparrow, white form 2-28-24 White-throated Sparrow, tan form2-28-24 White-throated Sparrow, tan form

Activity remained high because the birds were still looking for water. Both white and tan forms of the White-throated Sparrow were early birds. 

 

 

2-28-24 Two Pine Siskins, one American Goldfinch2-28-24 Two Pine Siskins, one American Goldfinch

Pine Siskins were back eating seed at the feeder, for a quick meal in the cold.

 

2-28-24 Rusty Blackbird2-28-24 Rusty Blackbird 2-28-24 Rusty Blackbird2-28-24 Rusty Blackbird
2-28-24 Red-winged Blackbird2-28-24 Red-winged Blackbird

Five Rusty Blackbirds and a single Red-winged Blackbird were in the swampy thicket foraging for good, A few of these also came to the bubbler.

  2-28-24 Yellow-rumped Warbler2-28-24 Yellow-rumped Warbler

The ubiquitous Yellow-rumped Warbler had an eye to the sky. Birds are always aware of danger! Hawks need to eat, too.

 

2-28-24 Mourning Dove, resting in leaves2-28-24 Mourning Dove, resting in leaves

Mourning Doves settled into the leaves to rest in the sunny, cold conditions.


2-29-24 Brown Creeper2-29-24 Brown Creeper

2-29-24 Rusty Blackbird2-29-24 Rusty Blackbird
2-29-24 Yellow-rumped Warbler2-29-24 Yellow-rumped Warbler

On Leap Day, Thursday, 2/29/24, our first Eastern Phoebe of the year was seen as it landed right outside my window in the sugar maple. It pumped its tail a few times and continued on. This is the earliest I've seen one, last year's first sighting was on 3/1/23.

A Brown Creeper came in and it looks to me like it has a tiny larva on its bill. One Rusty Blackbird was still around, and in the afternoon, our little Yellow-rumped Warbler was back on the sugar maple.

Get ready, it's almost time to turn those clocks ahead one hour!

Spring Forward

Sunday, March 10, 2024

 

 

 

 

 


 


Up to the GBBC Weekend ~ Great Backyard Bird Count 2-19-24

February 19, 2024  •  Leave a Comment

 

February flies! 

Now we're finishing up the weekend of the GBBC. Here are some of the highlights of the past few weeks.

 

2-9-24 Pine Siskins2-9-24 Pine Siskins

Pine Siskins continue to be seen at the water, in the native trees and at the feeders. 

  2-10-24 House Sparrow2-10-24 House Sparrow

2-9-24 Eurasian Tree Sparrow and House Sparrow composite2-9-24 Eurasian Tree Sparrow and House Sparrow composite
 

A single male House Sparrow has been showing up at the bubbler and at one feeder. If you've not seen these two naturalized species together before, here they are in one photo for comparison. They are introduced species that dominate and displace our native birds. 

 

2-11-24 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker immature female2-11-24 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker immature female

This immature female Yellow-bellied Sapsucker has been seen frequently at our sugar maples.

 

2-12-24 Eastern Bluebirds mating2-12-24 Eastern Bluebirds mating 2-12-24 Eastern Bluebird pair2-12-24 Eastern Bluebird pair

We have seen some sure signs of spring! Just by chance one afternoon, I caught this pair of Eastern Bluebirds in a quick mating gesture. The pair then bathed together. Their nesting box is going up soon!

 

2-14-24 American Goldfinch eating American Elm buds2-14-24 American Goldfinch eating American Elm buds

Six American Goldfinches were seen nibbling at American Elm buds for carotenoids, an essential ingredient in their diet.

 

On Friday morning, 2-16-24, these Wood Poppies (Stylophorum diphyllum) were already poking through the leaves. We still had some winter weather to experience that day.

 

2-16-24 White-throated Sparrow in brush pile2-16-24 White-throated Sparrow in brush pile

The White-throated Sparrow studied the sleet as it began to come down. Snow, too? 

  2-16-24 Rusty Blackbird, dragging right leg2-16-24 Rusty Blackbird, dragging right leg

A lone Rusty Blackbird was seen in the garden, dragging its right leg behind it. Would it survive the imminent weather?

 

2-16-24 Brown Creeper2-16-24 Brown Creeper

The Brown Creeper came in for some bark butter as the sleet changed over to snow.

 

2-16-24 Mourning Dove2-16-24 Mourning Dove 2-16-24 House Finches and American Goldfinch2-16-24 House Finches and American Goldfinch

Mourning Doves, House Finches and American Goldfinches toughed it out and clung to perches.

 

2-16-24 Eastern Bluebird2-16-24 Eastern Bluebird

Eastern Bluebirds carried on.

 

2-16-24 American Goldfinch2-16-24 American Goldfinch 2-16-24 American Robin in Smooth Hydrangeas2-16-24 American Robin in Smooth Hydrangeas

American Goldfinches and American Robins found some perches close to the ground to settle upon.

 

2-16-24 Six Pine Siskins and three American Goldfinches2-16-24 Six Pine Siskins and three American Goldfinches

About 2:30 pm, the snow intensified and so did the feeding frenzy!

 

2-16-24 Snow Day

To get the full picture, here's a short video of the snow as it accumulated during the day. Some of you don't get to experience this if you live in warmer climes, and surely you miss the quiet beauty! Try to identify the birds that come in.

 

2-17-24 American Crow2-17-24 American Crow

After the snowfall, the temperature dropped into the teens. An American Crow investigated the bubbler the next morning.

 

2-17-24 vWhite-throated Sparrow in Christmas tree cover2-17-24 vWhite-throated Sparrow in Christmas tree cover

This White-throated Sparrow woke up, cozy in its Christmas tree cover.

  2-17-24 Pine Siskin in Bald Cypress panicles2-17-24 Pine Siskin in Bald Cypress panicles

Saturday morning was clear and bright. Pine Siskins were feeding in the panicles of the Bald Cypress.

  2-18-24 Carolina Wren singing2-18-24 Carolina Wren singing

The ever cheerful Carolina Wren belted out its morning song from the spicebush (Lindera benzoin).

 

For all the photos since the first of February, begin here: 

February!

 

 

 


January reflections 2-1-24

February 01, 2024  •  Leave a Comment

 

We begin with a short video of clips from our Stealth Cam near the garden, taken in January.

 

January 2024

Deer, a three-legged coyote and an opossum came through the garden in varying degrees of cold, snowy and wet conditions.

Rusty Blackbirds foraged under the Buttonbush shrubs during freezing rain on 1-22-24. Brrr!!

 

Now, let's take a closer look at Pine Siskins that have wintered here in our sanctuary.

 

3-24-13 Pine Siskins eating thistle seed in 12" of snow

 


1-14-19 Pine Siskin eating seeds from Bald Cypress catkins (Taxodium distichum x Shawnee Brave).

 

12-24-20 Pine Siskins eating Beebalm seeds (Monarda fistulosa) in the garden.

 

2-13-21 Pine Siskin eating Cliff Goldenrod seeds (Solidago drummondii).

Pine Siskins are attracted to our yard in large part because of the abundance of native plant and insect food. 

One-sixth of their diet is insects (arthropods).

They will also feed on elm, maple and sweet gum seeds, E. red cedar, birch, spruce and pine. 

 

1-27-21 Pine Siskins will also eat seeds and berries of native Lonicera spp. like our Coral Trumpet Honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens).

 

12-13-20 We documented a green morph Pine Siskin.

As you can see, it is lighter in color with less dark streaking (less brown pigment)

and with yellow-gray-green tones on its back,(black and yellow pigments, carotenoids, retained) indicating a green morph.

What I learned just recently is that according to one study that examined 1500 specimens from 6 museum collections,

about 1% were found to be green morphs, all of which were male. Whether this plumage represents a true color morph or 

individual variation remains uncertain. It's considered an aberrant plumage. 

 

1-26-24 Six Pine Siskins three American Goldfinches1-26-24 Six Pine Siskins three American Goldfinches 1-27-24 Two Pine Siskins1-27-24 Two Pine Siskins

1-28-24 Green Morph and Two typical Pine Siskins1-28-24 Green Morph and Two typical Pine Siskins

On 1-28-24, I had a high count of 12 Pine Siskins.

As you can tell, all of them are darkly streaked with the exception of the bird on the left in this last photo.


 

1-29-24 Three Pine Siskins1-29-24 Three Pine Siskins

1-29-24 Green Morph Pine Siskin1-29-24 Green Morph Pine Siskin 1-29-24 Pine Siskin Composite with Green Morph1-29-24 Pine Siskin Composite with Green Morph 1-29-24 Two Pine Siskins, lower is Green Morph1-29-24 Two Pine Siskins, lower is Green Morph

Once again this winter, we have a green morph Pine Siskin. It was seen on three days. What a handsome bird!

Overall numbers have dropped as temperatures have warmed. The birds are foraging again for their native plant and insect foods.

 

1-25-24 Song Sparrow1-25-24 Song Sparrow

A Song Sparrow popped out on 1-25-24.

 

1-27-24 Downy Woodpecker and Northern Flicker females1-27-24 Downy Woodpecker and Northern Flicker females

A female Downy Woodpecker waited for a turn at the suet while the Northern Flicker female took its time.

 

1-29-24 Cooper's Hawk in fog1-29-24 Cooper's Hawk in fog

Fog helped disguise this Cooper's Hawk as it flew through the woodland. 

 

1-29-24 Blue Jay1-29-24 Blue Jay 1-29-24 Carolina Wrens1-29-24 Carolina Wrens

Once the hawk left, the Blue Jay and Carolina Wrens were back to business.

 

1-29-24 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker immature female1-29-24 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker immature female

Another immature female Yellow-bellied Sapsucker hammered into old wells of sap to drink. 
 

1-29-24 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker immature female1-29-24 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker immature female

Isn't nature beautiful?!!


1-31-24 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker immature female1-31-24 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker immature female

The sapsucker had worked so hard to get the sap flowing. 

 

1-31-24 E. Gray Squirrel at sapsucker wells1-31-24 E. Gray Squirrel at sapsucker wells

Many will enjoy its efforts!

 

 


Icy-dicey! 1-23-24

January 23, 2024  •  Leave a Comment

We prepared for the freezing rain with grippers on our boots, kept feeders filled and water features flowing.

Birds knew it was coming and tanked up!

 

'Have nothing in your houses that you do not know to be beautiful or believe to be useful' 

William Morris

 

1-16-24 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker female and European Starling1-16-24 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker female and European Starling

Before that storm, on 1-16-24, an immature male Yellow-bellied Sapsucker and an European Starling shared a moment at the bubbler. The starlings are not usually so accommodating. All of us who feed birds dread their persistence at driving away the native birds.

 

1-18-24 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker immature female1-18-24 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker immature female

Two days later, within fourteen minutes, three individual sapsuckers came in. The first was this immature female with the white throat.

 

1-18-24 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker immature1-18-24 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker immature

The second bird was this immature male with the red throat.

 

1-18-24 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker adult male1-18-24 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker adult male

Immediately, an adult male made its presence known!

 

1-18-24 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker immature and adult males1-18-24 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker immature and adult males

The two males began a chase around the small white oak. 

 

1-18-24 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker adult and immature males1-18-24 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker adult and immature males

"Where'd he go!?" The stunning adult male took over.

 

1-18-24 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker adult male1-18-24 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker adult male

This encounter made me think of all the sapsuckers that I've photographed since the first of the year and I put together the composite below. 

 

1-18-24 Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers this year!1-18-24 Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers this year!

White throats? Females. Red throats? Males. All the immature birds are in different stages of transitional plumage. Some have more red on the crown, more black on the chest, more yellow on the belly. The only adult bird is the male in the center. This species is just fascinating to study in winter!
 


1-18-24 Yellow-rumped Warbler1-18-24 Yellow-rumped Warbler 1-19-24 Yellow-rumped Warbler1-19-24 Yellow-rumped Warbler

Like the sapsuckers, there have been several Yellow-rumped Warblers around, too. 

  1-19-24 Red-bellied Woodpecker1-19-24 Red-bellied Woodpecker 1-19-24 Northern Cardinal1-19-24 Northern Cardinal

Usual suspects, like the Red-bellied Woodpecker and Northern Cardinal are enjoyed daily. Late afternoon sun shows off their brilliance. 

  1-19-24 Prints in the snow1-19-24 Prints in the snow

Tracks in the snow show that birds have been drinking at the stream bed where there is open water.

 

On Saturday morning, 1-20-24, I was in the breakfast room when I saw a flash of red to my right as I heard a Pileated Woodpecker. "Dan, do you see it on the railing?" Yes, he did! I had to back out of the room slowly with my handheld camera, moving the tripod would have been too much commotion and disturbed the bird. It was a good plan.

 

1-20-24 Pileated Woodpecker1-20-24 Pileated Woodpecker 1-20-24 Pileated Woodpecker1-20-24 Pileated Woodpecker 1-20-24 Pileated Woodpecker1-20-24 Pileated Woodpecker 1-21-24 Pileated Woodpecker and Northern Flicker composite1-21-24 Pileated Woodpecker and Northern Flicker composite

What a spectacle! It's just a glorious thing to see "The Boss!" We've had four different Northern Flickers, four Downy Woodpeckers, two Hairy Woodpeckers and other various birds taking suet. It was a thrill we both shared to see this largest of North American woodpeckers come in to feed. The Pileated Woodpecker is just a stunning bird.

 

That was not the only surprise that day. Since early November, our Haikubox has been recording American Tree Sparrows. "Ha, good luck seeing that one, show me the money!" I have only photographed this species in two prior years, 2014 and 2022, in February with snow cover. Well, I was upstairs and saw some birds moving around in the garden, and I spotted one.

 

1-20-24 FOY American Tree Sparrow in Arrowwood (Viburnum dentatum)1-20-24 FOY American Tree Sparrow in Arrowwood (Viburnum dentatum) 1-20-24 FOY American Tree Sparrow in cover of garden1-20-24 FOY American Tree Sparrow in cover of garden 1-20-24 FOY American Tree Sparrow1-20-24 FOY American Tree Sparrow

By the time I got the camera in place, it had moved to cover in the Arrowwood Viburnum (Viburnum dentatum). It took most of the afternoon finding it again in the garden and out in the lawn area, where I'd scattered some seed.

 

1-21-24 American Tree Sparrow near pond1-21-24 American Tree Sparrow near pond 1-21-24 American Tree Sparrow -2 in garden1-21-24 American Tree Sparrow -2 in garden

The next day, I convinced myself there were two. One was near the pond and another out much further in the garden under the Beautyberries, (Callicarpa americana) in the leaves. A needle in a haystack to spot, for sure! In Birds of the World, it says, "Over snow, known to beat weeds with wings and then fly to snow surface to retrieve seeds." Saw one again yesterday, so hope they have found their winter home.

 

1-21-24 Northern Flicker1-21-24 Northern Flicker 1-22-24 American Goldfinch and Pine Siskin in icy basin1-22-24 American Goldfinch and Pine Siskin in icy basin

The flickers are back, this female is a regular. American Goldfinches and Pine Siskins were at the bubbler bathing in the icy conditions with the freezing rain yesterday. Brrr! Conditions improved with temperatures above 35 degrees all night. It's nice to have a break in the cold!

 

 

 

 


Mid-January report 1-17-24

January 17, 2024  •  Leave a Comment

Enduring frigid temperatures with snow cover is winter's survival challenge for birds!

How do they make it? 

 

Recently, I had a call from my good friend, Bill Ruppert. "I have a question for you," he said. "The birds come in to the feeders for an hour or so and then disappear! Where do they go?" This was an excellent question! We talked about it for a while and I set out to find examples to share. 

Habitat = Food, Cover (Places to rest, nest and digest) and Water

 

Food is obviously important with seeds, fruits, nuts and sap that native plants provide. Birds also find insects on plants and in the leaves left in the beds. We help birds with supplemental foods in winter, foods high in fat to help them get through cold nights and maintain their fat reserves. In winter, birds especially need cover, places to rest and digest. (Nesting comes later for most birds.) So what do these "places to rest and digest" look like?

 

Even non-native plants can provide some cover. This is our climbing hydrangea (Hydrangea anomala subsp. petiolaris). In fall, it looks like this with golden leaves. In winter, the vine provides places for perching while the south facing stone wall soaks up sunshine and radiates a bit of warmth.
 

 

1-14-24 Northern Cardinal rests in climbing Hydrangea1-14-24 Northern Cardinal rests in climbing Hydrangea 1-14-24 Dark-eyed Juncos rest in climbing Hydrangea1-14-24 Dark-eyed Juncos rest in climbing Hydrangea 1-15-24 E. Bluebird rests in climbing Hydrangea1-15-24 E. Bluebird rests in climbing Hydrangea 1-15-24 Mourning Dove rests near stone wall1-15-24 Mourning Dove rests near stone wall

Birds will tuck in to rest in between forays for food. The area is out of the wind and birds might rest on the stems or on the ground. Shown are Northern Cardinal, Dark-eyed Juncos, Eastern Bluebird, and Mourning Dove. Perhaps you also have an area like that where birds can rest.

 

1-14-24 C. Grackles and European Starlings rest in leaf cover of shingle oak1-14-24 C. Grackles and European Starlings rest in leaf cover of shingle oak 1-14-24 Common Grackle in white oak1-14-24 Common Grackle in white oak

Oaks, especially young oaks like shingle oak (Quercus imbricaria) and white oak (Quercus alba) tend to hold onto leaves through winter. This is called marcescence. Here, a mixed flock of Common Grackles and European Starlings are using these leaves to help protect them from the strong winds. A single Common Grackle was nearby in the white oak. A couple days ago, I checked the shingle oak before sunrise and there were nine Cedar Waxwings in that same area, just waking up! 

 

1-14-24 Mourning Doves and Blue Jay rest in Buttonbush1-14-24 Mourning Doves and Blue Jay rest in Buttonbush

Another way to stay out of the wind is to take cover in twiggy shrubs, like these Mourning Doves in buttonbush (Cephalanthus occidentalis). The Blue Jay had just hopped down to forage. Buttonbush does best in low, wet areas. This plant provides a protected spot for birds here.

 

1-15-24 Pine Siskin rests in Roughleaf Dogwood1-15-24 Pine Siskin rests in Roughleaf Dogwood 1-15-24 American Goldfinch  rests in Roughleaf Dogwood1-15-24 American Goldfinch rests in Roughleaf Dogwood 1-15-24 White-throated Sparrow and American Goldfinch  rest in Roughleaf Dogwood1-15-24 White-throated Sparrow and American Goldfinch rest in Roughleaf Dogwood

1-15-24 E. Bluebird rests in Roughleaf dogwood1-15-24 E. Bluebird rests in Roughleaf dogwood

Another shrub/small tree that is used constantly is the rough-leaf dogwood (Cornus drummondii) next to the deck. It is on the south side of the house and protected from northwest winds. Birds rest, cat-nap and wait to take turns at the feeders and heated bird bath. There can be twenty or more birds at a time resting in this tree. They fluff up, cover their little talons and conserve energy! Pine Siskin, American Goldfinch, White-throated Sparrow and Eastern Bluebird are shown.

 

1-16-24 Dark-eyed Junco in cover of Copper Iris and Cliff Goldenrod1-16-24 Dark-eyed Junco in cover of Copper Iris and Cliff Goldenrod 1-16-24 Dark-eyed Junco in cover of Cliff Goldenrod and eating seeds1-16-24 Dark-eyed Junco in cover of Cliff Goldenrod and eating seeds

Back near the pond and stone wall, these Dark-eyed Juncos took cover in between the green swords of Copper Iris (Iris fulva) and Cliff Goldenrod (Solidago drummondii). The birds are getting a two-for-one deal here, eating the seeds of the goldenrod while sheltering under them.

 

1-16-24 Downy Woodpecker at rest on white oak1-16-24 Downy Woodpecker at rest on white oak

This Downy Woodpecker stayed out of the wind by clinging to the south side of this white oak (Quercus alba) by the bubbler pond. The bonus there is that the air stays a little warmer near the bubbler. Warmer air helps when the temperature dips below zero degrees! 

 

1-13-24 Rusty Blackbird and 15 American Robins1-13-24 Rusty Blackbird and 15 American Robins

All the water features have been used to the max during this cold spell. Large flocks of American Robins were mixed with blackbirds, like this lone Rusty Blackbird in the lower left.

 

1-13-24 Hairy Woodpecker1-13-24 Hairy Woodpecker

For the first time this year, a Hairy Woodpecker was seen on at the bubbler on 1/13/24. This day, as the coldest air was coming in, proved to be the busiest at the bubbler and feeders. Staying hydrated, well-fed and rested is key.

 

1-14-24 Red-bellied Woodpecker female spars with E. Bluebirds1-14-24 Red-bellied Woodpecker female spars with E. Bluebirds

After the first snow, the bubbler continued to be visited by many species. This female Red-bellied Woodpecker was adamant about its turn!

 

1-14-24 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker1-14-24 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

Both male and female Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers have been coming to drink.

 

1-15-24 Red-bellied Woodpecker hammers at ice1-15-24 Red-bellied Woodpecker hammers at ice

By the 15th, the stream bed was nearly completely iced over. This Red-bellied Woodpecker was hammering at the ice to drink the flowing water beneath.

 

1-15-24 N. Mockingbird1-15-24 N. Mockingbird

That day was also the first time this year that a N. Mockingbird came to the bubbler. 

 

1-16-24 Four E. Bluebirds1-16-24 Four E. Bluebirds

There's no prettier sight than Eastern Bluebirds on freshly fallen snow! Today, it got up to 40 degrees, but another cold spell is on the way.

 

We have gained 21 minutes of daylight since the Winter Solstice!

To view all the photos since the last post, begin here:

Photos since 1/10/24

 

 

 

 

 

Archive
January February March April May June July August September October (1) November December
January (3) February (2) March (1) April May June July August September October November December