Second week of April 4-16-20

April 16, 2020  •  Leave a Comment

 

Hermit Thrushes have been coming to the bubbler since 4-5-20. They are typically kind of shy birds, but like all thrushes, they do love to bathe.

 

4-6-20 Hermit Thrush4-6-20 Hermit Thrush 4-6-20 Hermit Thrush4-6-20 Hermit Thrush

 

One of the Red-shouldered Hawks has been coming in nearly every day. Sometimes it perches in the sugar maple by the pond to rest, or perhaps to digest a meal.

 

4-7-20 Red-shouldered Hawk4-7-20 Red-shouldered Hawk

 

We had a couple hot days in a row. On Wednesday, 4-8-20 the temperature reached 90.3 degrees, and the first Eastern Three-toed Box Turtle was seen in the woodland. It dug in under the leaves to stay cool. 

 

4-8-20 Eastern Three-toed Box Turtle4-8-20 Eastern Three-toed Box Turtle
 

Hairy Woodpeckers have enjoyed getting bark butter more often since we moved the feeder to the back pole. The male will come down to get a drink at the basin. It seemed to be admiring the bluebells one day. A Brown Creeper stopped in, it had been a week since we'd seen one. Birds are on the move!

 

4-9-20 Hairy Woodpecker4-9-20 Hairy Woodpecker 4-10-20 Brown Creeper4-10-20 Brown Creeper

 

We've seen a Yellow-rumped Warbler over the winter, but now they are coming into their striking breeding plumage. Since they're more common, they're often not given enough credit as a 'beautiful' warbler. What do you think?

 

4-11-20 Yellow-rumped Warbler4-11-20 Yellow-rumped Warbler

 

The Carolina Wrens have been very busy feeding nestlings and carrying away fecal sacs from the nest. This bird pecked away at a black cherry log until a larval tidbit was revealed. Easter morning brought the Easter Bunny, of course!

 

4-11-20 Carolina Wren with larvae for nestlings4-11-20 Carolina Wren with larvae for nestlings

4-12-20 Easter Bunny!4-12-20 Easter Bunny!

 

Easter evening brought us a new yard bird for #152. What a surprise it was to hear an Eastern Whip-poor-will right outside our back door. We used to hear them when we'd go camping as a family. It is a species in trouble, so we hope it found plenty of moths and insects to eat while it was here. If you're not familiar with its call, it can be quite loud and go on and on! Check it out:

Eastern Whip-poor-will 

 

Ruby-crowned Kinglets have been enjoying the 'bubble' and flashing that fiery crown!

 

4-13-20 Ruby-crowned Kinglet in 41 degrees4-13-20 Ruby-crowned Kinglet in 41 degrees 4-13-20 Ruby-crowned Kinglet4-13-20 Ruby-crowned Kinglet 4-13-20 Ruby-crowned Kinglet4-13-20 Ruby-crowned Kinglet 4-13-20 Ruby-crowned Kinglet4-13-20 Ruby-crowned Kinglet 4-13-20 Ruby-crowned Kinglet4-13-20 Ruby-crowned Kinglet

 

The first 'humming-blur' arrived on 4-15-20. It paid no attention to the feeder, but worked the Virginia bluebells (Mertensia virginica) all day long, for nectar and tiny insects. (Fourth photo - it's after an insect.) Ruby-throated Hummingbirds love tubular, bell-shaped flowers which do not need to be red to get their attention. The bird even perched in the smooth hydrangea (Hydrangea arborescens), watching over its bluebell patch.

 

4-15-20 FOY#56 Ruby-throated Hummingbird4-15-20 FOY#56 Ruby-throated Hummingbird 4-15-20 FOY#56 Ruby-throated Hummingbird4-15-20 FOY#56 Ruby-throated Hummingbird 4-15-20 FOY#56 Ruby-throated Hummingbird4-15-20 FOY#56 Ruby-throated Hummingbird

4-15-20 FOY#56 Ruby-throated Hummingbird with insect4-15-20 FOY#56 Ruby-throated Hummingbird with insect 4-15-20 FOY#56 Ruby-throated Hummingbird in Smooth Hydrangea (Hydrangea arborescens)4-15-20 FOY#56 Ruby-throated Hummingbird in Smooth Hydrangea (Hydrangea arborescens)

 

Also on 4-15-20, our first Northern Parula of the year was heard and briefly checked out the bubbler. 

 

4-15-20 FOY#57 Northern Parula4-15-20 FOY#57 Northern Parula

 

Back to the Ruby-crowned Kinglet with different views and more action shots at the bubbler today - they love to get wet even at 40 degrees!

 

4-15-20 Ruby-crowned Kinglet4-15-20 Ruby-crowned Kinglet

4-16-20 Ruby-crowned Kinglet4-16-20 Ruby-crowned Kinglet

4-16-20 Ruby-crowned Kinglet4-16-20 Ruby-crowned Kinglet   4-16-20 Ruby-crowned Kinglet4-16-20 Ruby-crowned Kinglet 4-16-20 Ruby-crowned Kinglet4-16-20 Ruby-crowned Kinglet 4-16-20 Ruby-crowned Kinglet4-16-20 Ruby-crowned Kinglet

 

This morning, the Ruby-throated Hummingbird stopped at the feeder for a full 'cuppa Joe' before heading to the bluebells. It was fun to see the flared scarlet gorget lit through the feathers by the sun!

 

4-16-20 Ruby-throated Hummingbird4-16-20 Ruby-throated Hummingbird

4-16-20 Ruby-throated Hummingbird4-16-20 Ruby-throated Hummingbird

 

One last surprise this morning was the appearance of a young female Yellow-bellied Sapsucker. A few of us agree that these NW winds have hampered the movement of birds, creating a bottleneck to the south of us. We anticipate a big change in the next week, with many more birds showing up. Hang onto your hats! Migration will be in full swing very soon! You can always check the galleries, I try to keep them updated daily.

 

To see all the photos since the last post, begin here:  Since 4-5-20

 

Nesting update: The Eastern Phoebes appear to have given up their nesting attempt here. I see them occasionally in the yard, foraging for insects. It's quite disappointing, but we cannot interfere with these processes.This is exactly why we need more good habitat, there's just not enough to sustain all of our native birds.

4-16-20 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker female4-16-20 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker female


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