First week of November, 11-8-20

November 08, 2020  •  Leave a Comment

 

The week began with a few warblers. Orange-crowned, a late Black-throated Green and a few Yellow-rumped Warblers were seen feeding and visiting the water features.

 

11-1-20 Orange-crowned Warbler11-1-20 Orange-crowned Warbler 11-1-20 Black-throated Green Warbler11-1-20 Black-throated Green Warbler

11-2-20 Yellow-rumped Warbler11-2-20 Yellow-rumped Warbler

 

A Winter Wren came in along with a lone Pine Siskin. A Golden-crowned Kinglet was also seen.


11-1-20 Winter Wren11-1-20 Winter Wren 11-1-20 Pine Siskin11-1-20 Pine Siskin

11-2-20 Golden-crowned Kinglet11-2-20 Golden-crowned Kinglet

 

A Downy Woodpecker took an unusual approach to the water, clinging to the Bubbler Rock. Dark-Eyed Juncos often find seeds in the garden, and then come to the water to wash them down. A Brown Creeper was seen every day, it must be one of the winter residents.


11-1-20 Downy Woodpecker11-1-20 Downy Woodpecker 11-2-20 Dark-eyed Junco11-2-20 Dark-eyed Junco

11-4-20 Brown Creeper11-4-20 Brown Creeper
 

The usual suspects now have to accept several species that will be around for the winter, yet some are not always ready to share. A Tufted Titmouse seemed to tell this White-throated Sparrow who was boss. Another came in later, all fluffed out, and satisfied to have the place to itself. 

 

11-2-20 Tufted Titmouse and White-throated Sparrow11-2-20 Tufted Titmouse and White-throated Sparrow

11-4-20 Tufted Titmouse11-4-20 Tufted Titmouse

 

A Carolina Wren drank from the well of the hummingbird feeder. Yes, there is still one feeder up, just in case a rare species would come in. Once we saw a Rufous Hummingbird, checking out the feeders, on 11-20-2008.
 

 

11-3-20 Carolina Wren11-3-20 Carolina Wren

 

American Robins have been dominating the water when they come in. Squabbles are quick to break out, thrushes love to get in to bathe.

  11-5-20 American Robins11-5-20 American Robins

 

The last of the Blackhaw fruits are being enjoyed by many different species. Northern Cardinals, American Robins and even Cedar Waxwings have come in to take them. It has gotten dry again, so birds are also using the sump puddle to have more access to water.

 

11-2-20 Northern Cardinal with Blackhaw fruit11-2-20 Northern Cardinal with Blackhaw fruit
11-6-20 American Robin with Blackhaw fruit11-6-20 American Robin with Blackhaw fruit 11-6-20 Cedar Waxwing11-6-20 Cedar Waxwing 11-6-20 Cedar Waxwing with Blackhaw fruit11-6-20 Cedar Waxwing with Blackhaw fruit 11-6-20 Cedar Waxwings11-6-20 Cedar Waxwings 11-6-20 Cedar Waxwings11-6-20 Cedar Waxwings 11-6-20 Cedar Waxwing11-6-20 Cedar Waxwing

 

On Saturday, two species of thrushes came in. The robins were not ready to budge but eventually, the Eastern Bluebirds had their way!

 

11-7-20 American Robin and Eastern Bluebird female11-7-20 American Robin and Eastern Bluebird female 11-7-20 Eastern Bluebird female11-7-20 Eastern Bluebird female 11-7-20 Eastern Bluebird females11-7-20 Eastern Bluebird females 11-7-20 Eastern Bluebird11-7-20 Eastern Bluebird

11-7-20 Eastern Bluebird11-7-20 Eastern Bluebird
11-7-20 Eastern Bluebird11-7-20 Eastern Bluebird

 

"The bluebird carries the sky upon his back."

Henry David Thoreau

 

 

To see all the photos since the last blog post:  November photos

 

Peace, and Good Health to you and yours!

 

 

 

 

 

 


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