Second week of November, 11-14-20

November 14, 2020  •  Leave a Comment

 

November 14, 2020

It's really November now, raw, cold and wet.

 

We begin with last Sunday afternoon and we were busy with a few tasks inside. When it came time to check the Stealth Cam later that day, we discovered a video that surprised us both! Tis the mating season for white-tailed deer and this looks to be a 10-point buck, drinking at the sump puddle. Look closely at the background - the doe is up at the bubbler. The second video is of the doe, from the Bubbler Cam. Well, there is rarely a dull moment around here!

 

11-8-20 Buck and Doe

11-8-20 Doe

 

This week has been one of changeover. Leaves have really been coming down after a couple mornings below freezing. The beautyberries are ripe and American Robins have been feasting on them.

 

11-9-20 American Robin on American Beautyberry (Callicarpa americana)11-9-20 American Robin on American Beautyberry (Callicarpa americana) 11-9-20 American Robin on American Beautyberry (Callicarpa americana)11-9-20 American Robin on American Beautyberry (Callicarpa americana) 11-9-20 American Robin on American Beautyberry (Callicarpa americana)11-9-20 American Robin on American Beautyberry (Callicarpa americana)

 

It has been dry until today, so the water features have been getting a real workout. Cedar Waxwings feel most comfortable when flocking in their family groups to come down together. They sheltered under oak leaves, to preen and fluff their feathers out. One adult bird seemed to be the sentry, looking about in every direction. It gave the signal to fly for cover, and they swirled up and away.

 

11-9-20 Cedar Waxwings11-9-20 Cedar Waxwings 11-9-20 Cedar Waxwing11-9-20 Cedar Waxwing 11-9-20 Cedar Waxwing11-9-20 Cedar Waxwing 11-9-20 Cedar Waxwing11-9-20 Cedar Waxwing 11-9-20 Cedar Waxwing11-9-20 Cedar Waxwing

 

Common Grackles have also been seen foraging in the leaves and taking baths at the pond and bubbler. Wednesday, there were more than twenty present.

 

11-9-20 Common Grackle11-9-20 Common Grackle

11-9-20 Common Grackle11-9-20 Common Grackle

 

An American Goldfinch rested in the rosy, sheltering leaves of the Arrowwood Viburnum (Viburnum dentatum x 'Blue Muffin'). Brown Creepers have been seen almost every day this week. On Monday, there were two calling back and forth and following each other through the woods. 

 

11-9-20 American Goldfinch in Viburnum (Viburnum dentatum x Blue Muffin)11-9-20 American Goldfinch in Viburnum (Viburnum dentatum x Blue Muffin)
11-10-20 Brown Creeper11-10-20 Brown Creeper

 

Yellow-rumped Warblers have come in for water on at least two days. A pair of Eurasian Tree Sparrows have been regular at the feeders and bubbler. The Blue Jays still go for water at the sump puddle. 

 

11-10-20 Yellow-rumped Warbler11-10-20 Yellow-rumped Warbler 11-10-20 Eurasian Tree Sparrows11-10-20 Eurasian Tree Sparrows 11-10-20 Blue Jay11-10-20 Blue Jay

 

American Robins have been the most numerous birds this week. It has been a constant "round robin of robins"! The large flock has been moving around the neighborhood and they can get rather feisty about dominating the water. A Cedar Waxwing made its own case, emphatically.

  11-10-20 American Robins11-10-20 American Robins 11-10-20 Cedar Waxwing and American Robin11-10-20 Cedar Waxwing and American Robin

 

American Goldfinches were the very first species to use the Bubbler twenty years ago. They usually get along, but this bird was certainly not a happy camper about sharing. Later, things settled down.

 

11-10-20 American Goldfinches11-10-20 American Goldfinches 11-10-20 American Goldfinches11-10-20 American Goldfinches 11-10-20 American Goldfinches11-10-20 American Goldfinches

11-10-20 American Goldfinches11-10-20 American Goldfinches

 

On Wednesday, three Pine Siskins were back. It had been ten days since we had seen any. The Cedar Waxwings had finally gotten a chance to bathe when the robins left. The remaining waxwing rather reluctantly shared some space with a siskin.

 

11-11-20 Pine Siskins11-11-20 Pine Siskins

11-12-20 Pine Siskin and Cedar Waxwing11-12-20 Pine Siskin and Cedar Waxwing

11-12-20 Pine Siskin and Cedar Waxwing11-12-20 Pine Siskin and Cedar Waxwing

11-12-20 Pine Siskin and Cedar Waxwing11-12-20 Pine Siskin and Cedar Waxwing

 

Northern Flickers have been thirsty, too. I've been seeing four individuals, two females and two males. The female is pictured first, then the male with the notable 'moustache'.

 

11-13-20 Northern Flicker female11-13-20 Northern Flicker female 11-13-20 Northern Flicker11-13-20 Northern Flicker

 

The bird of the week appeared briefly yesterday and I was only able to get one photo. This is a male Purple Finch. So, be watching those feeders carefully. This is predicted to be a very good winter for us to see them and other irruptive species.

 

11-13-20 FOS Purple Finch11-13-20 FOS Purple Finch

 

Here is a photo from a few years ago, with the Purple Finch on the left and a House Finch on the right.

 

Purple Finch on left, House Finch on rightPurple Finch on left, House Finch on right

 

Have fun watching the feeders!

 

 


 


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