Second week of October, 2020

October 15, 2020  •  Leave a Comment

 

Oh, my! Saturday, 10-10-20 was like this all day long!

A Tennessee Warbler was dwarfed by two American Robins who claimed possession of the water. 

 

10-10-20 American Robins and Tennessee Warbler10-10-20 American Robins and Tennessee Warbler

 

Four new first of the season (FOS) birds arrived that day. I was so tickled when this tiny Winter Wren popped out from under the deck and bounced its cheery hello to me.

 

10-10-20 FOS Winter Wren10-10-20 FOS Winter Wren

 

At the sump puddle, joining the influx of robins was a solitary Wood Thrush! I believe it's the first time one has been here in the fall. It was looking for food among the cypress knees.

 

10-10-20 FOS Wood Thrush10-10-20 FOS Wood Thrush

 

Another FOS species was Blue-headed Vireo. There were two birds, the first had a bluer head than the second bird. Their 'spectacles' make their eyes look huge. They both took splash baths.

 

10-10-20 Blue-headed Vireo10-10-20 Blue-headed Vireo

10-10-20 Blue-headed Vireo10-10-20 Blue-headed Vireo

 

Our FOS Brown Creeper arrived on Saturday, too. This bird went to the water on several days, staying close to the tree, its familiar 'terrain'. 

 

10-10-20 FOS Brown Creeper10-10-20 FOS Brown Creeper

10-12-20 Brown Creeper10-12-20 Brown Creeper

 

A Red-breasted Nuthatch has been around, foraging for insects, too. It's always great fun to be outside to hear and see them.

 

10-11-20 Red-breasted Nuthatch10-11-20 Red-breasted Nuthatch

 

 

Both kinglets have been here most days this past week. The Golden-crowned have been fewer in number, but oh, so beautiful!

 

10-10-20 Golden-crowned Kinglet10-10-20 Golden-crowned Kinglet 10-10-20 Golden-crowned Kinglet10-10-20 Golden-crowned Kinglet 10-10-20 Golden-crowned Kinglet10-10-20 Golden-crowned Kinglet

 

There have been at least 3 Ruby-crowned Kinglets almost every time I've looked in any one tree! The other day, two were constantly chasing each other in dizzying spirals. Finally, one of them really enjoyed a bath without being disturbed. And, boy, did that bird ever flash!

 

10-10-20 Ruby-crowned Kinglet10-10-20 Ruby-crowned Kinglet 10-14-20 Ruby-crowned Kinglet10-14-20 Ruby-crowned Kinglet 10-14-20 Ruby-crowned Kinglet10-14-20 Ruby-crowned Kinglet

 

Now, for the warblers. There have been regular visitors and two rarer birds. Black-throated Green, Nashville and Tennessee have been here at least every other day. The Chestnut-sided was here just once, with the influx of birds on Saturday.

 

10-10-20 Black-throated Green Warbler10-10-20 Black-throated Green Warbler 10-10-20 Nashville Warbler10-10-20 Nashville Warbler 10-10-20 Tennessee Warbler10-10-20 Tennessee Warbler

10-10-20 Chestnut-sided Warbler10-10-20 Chestnut-sided Warbler

 

Yellow-rumped Warblers have been at the bubbler, the dripper baths and the stream bed, in very good numbers. Some think of them as dull. But, see how their plumage is perfect camouflage with the mossy rocks and falling leaves of our native trees. 

 

10-12-20 Yellow-rumped Warbler10-12-20 Yellow-rumped Warbler

 

In a typical fall, I'll have several days with Blackburnian Warblers. On 10-12-20, finally the second bird of fall appeared, ready for a good old-fashioned splash-fest! The birds are SO grateful for water right now!

 

10-12-20 Blackburnian Warbler10-12-20 Blackburnian Warbler 10-12-20 Blackburnian Warbler10-12-20 Blackburnian Warbler 10-12-20 Blackburnian Warbler10-12-20 Blackburnian Warbler 10-12-20 Blackburnian Warbler10-12-20 Blackburnian Warbler

 

The following day we were without power for an hour, which meant NO bubbler or pond pumps working! It was restored, then off again for 20 minutes and finally, all was back in order. Things were beginning to pick up at the bubbler, a Yellow-rumped and Tennessee had been in the basin when I looked up from the camera to see...a male Cape May Warbler! This is the first time I've seen a male here in the fall. It is a rare bird, and considered 'casual' by mid-October with only 5-15 records in the state.

 

10-13-20 FOS Cape May Warbler! Rare!10-13-20 FOS Cape May Warbler! Rare! 10-13-20 FOS Cape May Warbler! Rare!10-13-20 FOS Cape May Warbler! Rare! 10-13-20 FOS Cape May Warbler! Rare!10-13-20 FOS Cape May Warbler! Rare! 10-13-20 FOS Cape May Warbler! Rare!10-13-20 FOS Cape May Warbler! Rare! 10-13-20 FOS Cape May Warbler! Rare!10-13-20 FOS Cape May Warbler! Rare! 10-13-20 FOS Cape May Warbler! Rare!10-13-20 FOS Cape May Warbler! Rare!

 

The navigational coding packed into a migratory bird's DNA is exceptional. I wondered, is it the same bird that was here on 5-6-20 when it was in too big a hurry to be first on its territory? It had stopped to take a look at the bubbler then, and with helpful winds and a bit of luck might return. Well, inquiring minds need to know...but the bird kept that answer to itself. Its presence was gift enough for me. 

 

5-6-20 Cape May Warbler!5-6-20 Cape May Warbler!

 

To view all the photos since the last post, begin here:  Second week of October, 2020

 

 

 


Comments

No comments posted.
Loading...

Archive
January February March April May June July August September October (1) November December