Happy 20th Anniversary for the Bubbler, and October sightings 10-25-20

October 25, 2020  •  Leave a Comment

Yes, 20 years for the Bubbler, and October is still busy with migration.

 

One Nashville Warbler joined three Tennessee Warblers in a bit of an Indian summer party atmosphere. American Robins utilized the dripper baths while a Downy Woodpecker got a drink in the stream bed of the big pond.

 

10-17-20 3 Tennessee Warblers and Nashville Warbler10-17-20 3 Tennessee Warblers and Nashville Warbler 10-17-20 American Robins10-17-20 American Robins 10-17-20 Downy Woodpecker10-17-20 Downy Woodpecker

 

Over at the Bubbler, Eastern Phoebes continued to come in for sips of water and quick splash-baths. From tiny Ruby-crowned Kinglets to large American Crows, the water features have been visited often until we finally got some rain. 

 

10--18-20 Eastern Phoebe10--18-20 Eastern Phoebe 10-18-20 Ruby-crowned Kinglets10-18-20 Ruby-crowned Kinglets 10-18-20 American Crow10-18-20 American Crow

 

Our first of the season, FOS Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers arrived on Wednesday, 10-21-20. A female flew in first, but was quickly upset by an immature bird, which was instantly joined by another. I saw the female again later that day, but the little scruffy ones flew up into the canopy.

 

10-21-20 FOS Yellow-bellied Sapsucker female10-21-20 FOS Yellow-bellied Sapsucker female 10-21-20 FOS Yellow-bellied Sapsucker female and immature10-21-20 FOS Yellow-bellied Sapsucker female and immature 10-21-20 FOS Yellow-bellied Sapsucker immatures10-21-20 FOS Yellow-bellied Sapsucker immatures

 

The following day, a couple titmice mirrored each other in getting freshened up. 

 

10-22-20 Tufted Titmice10-22-20 Tufted Titmice

 

A Blue-headed Vireo had the basin all to itself when it came in later. Apparently, this uncommon species isn't often seen in places other than parks and larger migrant traps. Lucky us, this vireo really knows how to belly-flop! Whoopee!

 

10-22-20 Blue-headed Vireo10-22-20 Blue-headed Vireo 10-22-20 Blue-headed Vireo10-22-20 Blue-headed Vireo 10-22-20 Blue-headed Vireo10-22-20 Blue-headed Vireo 10-22-20 Blue-headed Vireo10-22-20 Blue-headed Vireo

 

After the vireo left, it got very quiet, so to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Bubbler, we gave it a little makeover. We had planned to replace the tubing with a slightly larger diameter and Dan had gathered all the components. This small change would push 25% more water through the tubing. It was our last warm day to tackle the project, and we got it done. I also raised the rock in the basin so it now flows over the flat face in a way that makes a bit more sound and flushes water through the whole basin. We liked it, now would the birds notice?

 

10-22-20 New tubing, more vigorous flow10-22-20 New tubing, more vigorous flow 10-22-20 New tubing, more vigorous flow in basin. Raised rock for more sound.10-22-20 New tubing, more vigorous flow in basin. Raised rock for more sound.

10-23-20 Bubbler Makeover

 

The next morning, I saw a greenish bird fly into the small elm behind the Bubbler. It was a female Summer Tanager. This is getting late for this species! It kept looking around and then flew to the Blackhaw viburnum, grabbed a ripe drupe and carried it higher, out of sight. Later that day, an American Robin came in to feast on them and a Yellow-rumped Warbler was eyeing the fruit. 

 

10-23-20 Summer Tanager female10-23-20 Summer Tanager female

10-23-20 American Robin eating Blackhaw fruit10-23-20 American Robin eating Blackhaw fruit
10-23-20 Yellow-rumped Warbler10-23-20 Yellow-rumped Warbler

 

Back at the basin, the birds were all excited! Three Ruby-crowned Kinglets were popping in and out, and just as one got in to bathe, a Blue-headed Vireo came in to check things out. Yes, it looked like the birds approved the new look.

  10-23-20 Ruby-crowned Kinglets and Blue-headed Vireo10-23-20 Ruby-crowned Kinglets and Blue-headed Vireo

 

A single Black-throated Green Warbler came in and was followed by an Orange-crowned Warbler. Look closely, yes, the crown is visible on this drab little bird.

  10-23-20 Black-throated Green Warbler10-23-20 Black-throated Green Warbler 10-23-20 Orange-crowned Warbler10-23-20 Orange-crowned Warbler 10-23-20 Orange-crowned Warbler10-23-20 Orange-crowned Warbler 10-23-20 Orange-crowned Warbler10-23-20 Orange-crowned Warbler 10-23-20 Orange-crowned Warbler10-23-20 Orange-crowned Warbler 10-23-20 Orange-crowned Warbler10-23-20 Orange-crowned Warbler

 

White-throated Sparrows have arrived, and they've been in the basin. A Tennessee Warbler came briefly in the morning.

 

10-23-20 White-throated Sparrow10-23-20 White-throated Sparrow 10-24-20 Tennessee Warbler10-24-20 Tennessee Warbler

 

A new bird for the year arrived yesterday, 10-24-20, a Pine Siskin for #118. Large flocks are being seen in the area now. I hope this visitor found the finch feeders, there is one freshly filled and waiting in the garden near all the seed heads of Purple Coneflower, Ironweed and Eastern Blazing Star. This is an irruptive species which only comes our way when food is scarce up north. Its needle-sharp bill and yellow wing patches help to distinguish it from the larger female House Finch in the last photo.

 

10-24-20 FOY#118 Pine Siskin10-24-20 FOY#118 Pine Siskin 10-24-20 House Finch and FOY#118 Pine Siskin10-24-20 House Finch and FOY#118 Pine Siskin

 

To view all the photos since 10-15-20, begin here: Images

 

 

 

 


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