Hummer Haven UnLtd. | August has begun 8-4-14

August has begun 8-4-14

August 04, 2018  •  Leave a Comment

Young birds continue to adjust to their surroundings.  Every morning we hear Northern Cardinals, chipping to keep in contact with their family. A female brought a black oil sunflower seed to this fledgling and then left it on its own to figure out how to get a drink. 

 

Northern Cardinals 7-24-18Northern Cardinals 7-24-18 Northern Cardinal juvenile 7-24-18Northern Cardinal juvenile 7-24-18 Northern Cardinal juvenile 7-24-18Northern Cardinal juvenile 7-24-18

 

With the cool front that came through, we received almost 2 inches of much needed rain. We've also seen an uptick on the numbers of Ruby-throated Hummingbirds. These males looked kind of bedraggled as they are into their summer molt and getting new feathers. Young challengers are approaching the feeders and we often see two or more birds at a time. 

 

Ruby-throated Hummingbird 7-30-18Ruby-throated Hummingbird 7-30-18 Ruby-throated Hummingbird 7-30-18Ruby-throated Hummingbird 7-30-18 Ruby-throated Hummingbirds 7-30-18Ruby-throated Hummingbirds 7-30-18 Ruby-throated Hummingbird 7-30-18Ruby-throated Hummingbird 7-30-18

 

The hummingbirds are seen early in the garden, hitting flowers like the Azure Sage (Salvia azurea) and the Jewelweed (Impatiens capensis).

 

Azure Sage (Salvia azurea) 7-28-18Azure Sage (Salvia azurea) 7-28-18 Jewelweed (Impatiens capensis) 7-30-18Jewelweed (Impatiens capensis) 7-30-18

 

I'm still keeping an eye on the chrysalis of the Eastern Black Swallowtail. It can't be much longer before the emergence of the butterfly!

 

E. Black Swallowtail chrysalis  8-4-18E. Black Swallowtail chrysalis 8-4-18

 

I've seen female Monarchs on several different days in the garden, laying eggs on Marsh Milkweed (Asclepias incarnata). They tuck their little treasures into the flower clusters, safely hidden. Many eggs are deposited on plants throughout the garden; the effort takes most of the sunny hours of a day.

 

Monarch laying eggs 7-28-18Monarch laying eggs 7-28-18 Monarch laying eggs on Marsh Milkweed (Asclepias incarnata) 7-28-18Monarch laying eggs on Marsh Milkweed (Asclepias incarnata) 7-28-18 Monarch laying eggs on Marsh Milkweed (Asclepias incarnata) 7-28-18Monarch laying eggs on Marsh Milkweed (Asclepias incarnata) 7-28-18 Monarch laying eggs on Marsh Milkweed (Asclepias incarnata) 7-28-18Monarch laying eggs on Marsh Milkweed (Asclepias incarnata) 7-28-18 Monarch laying eggs on Marsh Milkweed (Asclepias incarnata) 7-28-18Monarch laying eggs on Marsh Milkweed (Asclepias incarnata) 7-28-18

 

A female Spicebush Swallowtail was nectaring at Salvia Black and Blue (Salvia guaranitica x Black and Blue). This looked to be a very fresh butterfly.

 

Spicebush Swallowtail female 7-30-18Spicebush Swallowtail female 7-30-18 Spicebush Swallowtail female 7-30-18Spicebush Swallowtail female 7-30-18

 

In between feeding, the swallowtail rested on plants like Coral Trumped Honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens).

 

Spicebush Swallowtail female 7-30-18Spicebush Swallowtail female 7-30-18

 

The Monarchs also need time to feed and rest. Sometimes, they are more difficult to find in prime habitat. By blending in, they can protect themselves and their offspring.

 

Monarch on Purple Coneflower 7-27-18Monarch on Purple Coneflower 7-27-18   Monarch female 7-30-18Monarch female 7-30-18 Monarch female 7-30-18Monarch female 7-30-18

 

Those hot and hazy days have returned and the garden is waning but still productive in August! Sweet Coneflowers (Rudbeckia submentosum) abound, attracting small pollinators.

 

Sweet Coneflower (Rudbeckia submentosum) 7-28-18Sweet Coneflower (Rudbeckia submentosum) 7-28-18

 

If you look carefully, you'll find lightning bugs asleep among them. The cut flowers will last 10 days or more if you choose to bring some inside!

 

Lightning Bug resting in Sweet Coneflower 7-28-18Lightning Bug resting in Sweet Coneflower 7-28-18

 

This morning, I found a new butterfly species for us, a rare Red-banded Hairstreak. It is such a joy to discover new creatures finding our sanctuary.

 

Red- banded Hairstreak - rare 8-4-18Red- banded Hairstreak - rare 8-4-18

Enjoy summer's bounty!

 

 


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