Hummer Haven UnLtd. | Busy birds, bees, butterflies and more 7-24-18

Busy birds, bees, butterflies and more 7-24-18

July 24, 2018  •  Leave a Comment

Young birds are learning the ropes at this point in the summer. This young Downy Woodpecker has watched its parent go to the feeder for a drink of water and decided to try doing the same. 

 

Downy Woodpecker juvenile 7-14-18Downy Woodpecker juvenile 7-14-18

 

There is at least one family of Tufted Titmice that has been exploring the water features. They watch each other and take turns investigating.

 

Tufted Titmouse juvenile 7-21-18Tufted Titmouse juvenile 7-21-18 Tufted Titmouse juvenile 7-21-18Tufted Titmouse juvenile 7-21-18

 

Robins are always sparring over water rights! These two birds had staked claim on the dripper bath. Eventually, they both got wet.

 

American Robins  7-16-18American Robins 7-16-18

 

An American Goldfinch followed up its bath in the stream bed by preening in the oak leaf hydrangea above it.

 

American Goldfinch 7-16-18American Goldfinch 7-16-18

 

The Red-shouldered Hawks have been seen together in the sugar maple by the pond.  Last Thursday evening, the male watched the goldfish for a while, and then spotted another prey behind it, moving on the ground.

 

Red-shouldered Hawk  7-19-18Red-shouldered Hawk 7-19-18

 

It landed in a peculiar way, with its talons curled in so as not to harm its prey, which turned out to be a night crawler.

 

Red-shouldered Hawk  7-19-18Red-shouldered Hawk 7-19-18 Red-shouldered Hawk  7-19-18Red-shouldered Hawk 7-19-18 Red-shouldered Hawk  7-19-18Red-shouldered Hawk 7-19-18

 

It was more of a tidbit than a meal, but they do take many invertebrates. Yesterday, we heard the squawks of a youngster who was staying high in the trees. 

 

The temps have moderated this week, thank goodness. It's been easier to spend more time looking for activity in the garden. A female Blue Dasher rested on the dried flower stalk of Water Canna (Thalia dealbata).

 

Blue Dasher female 7-21-18Blue Dasher female 7-21-18

 

Yesterday, a fresh looking female Monarch was nectaring on Purple Coneflowers (Echinacea purpurea).

 

Monarch female on Purple Coneflower  7-23-18Monarch female on Purple Coneflower 7-23-18

 

Bumblebees and smaller bees have also been very busy. The little one tried to bump off the bumble, to no avail.

 

Bumblebee on Purple Coneflower  7-23-18Bumblebee on Purple Coneflower 7-23-18

 

This spring, I had allowed a seedling Bronze Fennel to remain in the garden.  Fennel is a host plant for the Eastern Black Swallowtail butterfly, and I was hoping I might see more of them again. This bumblebee was busy at its flowers.

 

Bumblebee on Bronze Fennel  7-23-18Bumblebee on Bronze Fennel 7-23-18

 

I carefully checked the tall stems, and wow, there was an Eastern Black Swallowtail chrysalis! It could still be a week or so before the butterfly emerges.

 

Eastern Black Swallowtail chrysalis on Bronze Fennel  7-23-18Eastern Black Swallowtail chrysalis on Bronze Fennel 7-23-18

 

Tiny pollinators were all over the flowers of the American Beautyberries (Callicarpa americana). The flowers will in turn become the berries that will feed the birds in late fall and winter. 

 

Pollinators on American Beautyberry 7-23-18Pollinators on American Beautyberry 7-23-18

 

It's time to get back outside!

 

 

 

 

 

 


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