Ruby-throated Hummingbird on garden arborRuby-throated Hummingbird on garden arborOne of many ruby-throated hummingbirds in our garden rests on the garden arbor.

Welcome to our blog! It's all about our discoveries here in our Shady Oaks yard, a Sanctuary for birds and other wildlife. We began to restore habitat for wildlife here in 1996 and gauge our success by the diversity of species we observe and document with our photography. We hope you enjoy our images and come back often to see what's new! 

October is "ober!" 10-31-22

October 31, 2022  •  Leave a Comment

 

Cover, Food and Water

 

First, let's take a look at how native plants provide essential cover, or safe places to rest, nest and digest.

 

 

This is the Bubbler area, with the native smooth hydrangeas (Hydrangea arborescens) in the upper right, surrounding the back of the Bubbler. 

 

 

From the opposite side, one can see the umbrella effect of the shrubs on the west side. Birds constantly fly into the twiggy cover of these plants. The birds feel safe as they check out the different ways to access the water, then preen and rest. 

 

10-22-22 Yellow-rumped Warbler in cover of smooth hydrangea10-22-22 Yellow-rumped Warbler in cover of smooth hydrangea

 

This Yellow-rumped Warbler flew in there after a bath, preened its feathers and then looked for any tiny insects. This is the kind of activity that I see all the time, so if you have a water feature, you might want to think about adding more native shrubs around it for cover. It helps the birds feel safe! Use this resource to find the best plants recommended by Doug Tallamy and his research, tailored to your zip code.

 

Native Plant Finder, “Best” = Keystone Plants:

  https://www.nwf.org/NativePlantFinder/

 

10-19-22 Eastern Bluebird eating Virginia creeper berries10-19-22 Eastern Bluebird eating Virginia creeper berries 10-24-22 Eastern Bluebird after Blackhaw drupes10-24-22 Eastern Bluebird after Blackhaw drupes 10-19-22 Eastern Bluebird10-19-22 Eastern Bluebird
 

The last post showed the blue berries of the Virginia Creeper(Parthenocissus quinquefolia), and that is what the Eastern Bluebird is eating in the first photo. The second bird has picked off the much larger drupe of the Blackhaw(Viburnum prunifolium). Fall fruits help birds fatten up for the winter!

 

10-20-22 First winter Chipping Sparrow10-20-22 First winter Chipping Sparrow 10-21-22 First fall Chipping Sparrow10-21-22 First fall Chipping Sparrow

 

A first fall Chipping Sparrow had me scratching my head, consulting the field guides and my birding friends! Was it a rare Clay-colored Sparrow? No, because it has the dark eye line and a grayish rump, they kindly told me. The third photo shows a spring adult bird in breeding plumage. Birds can be tricky to identify!

 

Now we move on to the Cutest Bird Contest...

 

10-21-22 Winter Wren10-21-22 Winter Wren 10-21-22 Winter Wren10-21-22 Winter Wren

 

A diminutive Winter Wren is the first contestant, mousey-brown and perky.

 

10-28-22 Brown Creeper10-28-22 Brown Creeper 10-21-22 Brown Creeper10-21-22 Brown Creeper

 

How about the Brown Creeper, which I call the 'little toasted marshmallow'?

 

10-27-22 Red-breasted Nuthatch10-27-22 Red-breasted Nuthatch

10-21-22 Red-breasted Nuthatch10-21-22 Red-breasted Nuthatch

 

And the Red-breasted Nuthatches make us smile with their 'tiny tin horn' call!

 

10-19-22 Ruby-crowned Kinglet10-19-22 Ruby-crowned Kinglet 10-19-22 Ruby-crowned Kinglets10-19-22 Ruby-crowned Kinglets

 

Ruby-crowned Kinglets? They definitely rank high on the humorously cute scale.

  10-28-22 Golden-crowned Kinglet10-28-22 Golden-crowned Kinglet 10-24-22 Golden-crowned Kinglet10-24-22 Golden-crowned Kinglet

 

There's nothing like being flashed by a Golden-crowned Kinglet! I'll leave it up to you to pick a favorite, if you can. 

 

10-28-22 FOY #114 Field Sparrow10-28-22 FOY #114 Field Sparrow 10-28-22 FOY #114 Field Sparrow10-28-22 FOY #114 Field Sparrow

 

I was really pleased to see a Field Sparrow come to the bubbler, maybe only the third time I've had one here. This species is in decline, with a Conservation Concern Score of 12, just like the next bird.

 

10-28-22 Mourning Dove, juvenile10-28-22 Mourning Dove, juvenile 10-29-22 Mourning Doves10-29-22 Mourning Doves

 

Mourning Doves are also having difficulty finding good habitat. The first photo shows a juvenile bird, the first time I've managed to photograph one. Its tail feathers are still growing out, it looks very young. Don't know where they nested, but I'm so glad to see a young bird.

 

Listening for birds, with a little help...

 

12-17-13 Bird Monitor12-17-13 Bird Monitor 11-29-14 Bird Monitor11-29-14 Bird Monitor

 

In 2013, I purchased a baby monitor, with the microphone mounted inside this PVC pipe that Dan put together and painted brown. It's nice to turn it on and listen to whatever birds might be calling outside, when I'm inside. Then, I step out to look for them and confirm their presence. It keeps me connected to what's happening in our sanctuary. 

 

 

 

We recently added another device called a Haikubox to help us know what may be here in our habitat.(It seems to be out of stock again, we were on the waiting list for a while. FYI, we receive no compensation for mentioning this on our website.) Here is an article about it and how it was developed.

Haikubox gives citizen scientists a tool to track birds

 

After one week, here is the list of birds detected by our Haikubox and how often they were recorded. The app alerts me to new birds, with low, medium or high confidence. Now, I did not see or hear many of these birds such as the Ruby-throated Hummingbird, Wild Turkey or Mourning Warbler. It sure has me looking and listening for them, though! When I can confirm a bird that is detected, I do so with the app.

Now, we've always realized that we would never know all the birds that might be here because we have intentionally provided lots of cover (safe places in the form of native plants) for them.

The best part about the Haikubox is that it is working all the time and sending the data directly to the K. Lisa Yang Center for Conservation Bioacoustics at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. We love the idea of making this contribution to the data set of "where the birds are", 24/7.

 


 

10-26-22 Barred Owl10-26-22 Barred Owl

Barred Owl, resting in cover, quietly

 

Happy Halloween!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Mid-October update. 10/19/22

October 19, 2022  •  1 Comment

Mid-October and a hard freeze with 29.6 degrees on Tuesday, 10-18-22!

And, it was 28.9 degrees this morning - brrr!

 

Let's look at the latest migrants, which we won't be seeing again until next April.

 

10-9-22 Chestnut-sided Warbler10-9-22 Chestnut-sided Warbler

 

Chestnut-sided Warbler 

 

10-9-22 Black-throated Green Warbler10-9-22 Black-throated Green Warbler

 

Black-throated Green Warbler 

  10-9-22 Blackburnian Warbler10-9-22 Blackburnian Warbler

 

Blackburnian Warbler

 

10-14-22 Nashville Warbler10-14-22 Nashville Warbler

 

Nashville Warbler

  10-14-22 Orange-crowned Warbler10-14-22 Orange-crowned Warbler 10-14-22 Orange-crowned Warbler10-14-22 Orange-crowned Warbler 10-14-22 Orange-crowned Warbler10-14-22 Orange-crowned Warbler

 

Orange-crowned Warbler, yes the crown is barely visible on this little dull bird, but there.

 

10-9-22 Tennessee Warbler10-9-22 Tennessee Warbler
10-14-22 Tennessee Warbler with insect on Elm (Ulmus americana)10-14-22 Tennessee Warbler with insect on Elm (Ulmus americana)

 

Tennessee Warblers have been seen on many days finding tiny insects in the bark of this young American Elm (Ulmus americana).

 

10-17-22 Orange-crowned Warbler10-17-22 Orange-crowned Warbler 10-17-22 Orange-crowned Warbler10-17-22 Orange-crowned Warbler

 

Another Orange-crowned Warbler had luck finding tiny larvae on the flower heads of Smooth Hydrangea (Hydrangea arborescens). 

 

10-17--22 Yellow-rumped Warbler10-17--22 Yellow-rumped Warbler 10-18-22 Yellow-rumped Warbler10-18-22 Yellow-rumped Warbler

 

Yellow-rumped Warblers will now be around a good part of the winter.

We may yet see a stray late bird of another species but time is running out for them to make it to their winter homes. 

How about a focus on two confusing species? Tennessee and Orange-crowned Warblers can be vexing. Take a look.

 

 

There are some differences, not often easy to see before they flit away!

The Orange-crowned has a dingy breast with subtle streaking, yellow undertail coverts, and is barely pale below. It is often quite gray.

The Tennessee Warbler has a trace of a wing bar, white under tail coverts and a more conspicuous eyebrow stripe.

Underparts are paler with almost no streaking and an overall greener look. Here they are, together.

 

 

Maybe next fall it will be easier!!

 

10-12-22 Blue-headed Vireo10-12-22 Blue-headed Vireo

 

Blue-headed Vireo, always a welcome sight!

 

10-14-22 Dark-eyed Junco10-14-22 Dark-eyed Junco 10-15-22 Dark-eyed Junco10-15-22 Dark-eyed Junco

 

Dark-eyed Juncos have arrived!

 

10-14-22 Common Grackle10-14-22 Common Grackle 10-14-22 Common Grackle10-14-22 Common Grackle 10-14-22 43 Common Grackles10-14-22 43 Common Grackles

 

Common Grackles came as twenty, then a hundred. Counted forty-three birds in this screen shot at the bubbler.

 

10-18-22 Red-breasted Nuthatch female10-18-22 Red-breasted Nuthatch female 10-18-22 Red-breasted Nuthatch10-18-22 Red-breasted Nuthatch

 

After not seeing one for five days, two Red-breasted Nuthatches came in on Tuesday, 10-18-22 and went directly to the peanut feeder. Perhaps this is the pair from last winter, returning to Shady Oaks as their winter digs!

 

10-18-22 Blue Jay after peanut crumbs10-18-22 Blue Jay after peanut crumbs 10-10-22 Northern Cardinal10-10-22 Northern Cardinal
 

Blue Jay and Northern Cardinal, let's not forget the home crowd! They will keep us company now.

 

Friday, we will celebrate 22 years since the Bubbler first began attracting birds.

Now with 125 species and 2 hybrids documented at this water feature, 

we are adding another 'tool' to become better 'citizen scientists'. More on that exciting development next time!

 

Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia) provides fatty blue berries for flycatchers, 

thrushes, warblers and vireos on their way south, and for overwintering birds, too.

 

Enjoy the wonder of fall!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Late September, Part Two on 10-8-22

October 08, 2022  •  Leave a Comment

 

Sunset on Sanibel Island, 12-26-19

 

Our dear friends in Fort Myers have been on our minds and in our hearts

 since Hurricane Ian came ashore on 9-29-22.

The catastrophic destruction of these places we love is heartbreaking to see in photos and videos.

We send our love, courage and strength, and we're with you in spirit every step of the way, as you recover.

 

 

Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia)

 

It is Fall now.

Many of the migratory birds have been seen on several days in succession, rotating through in small flocks. They're feeding in the layers of trees, shrubs and ground cover finding insects, seeds, nectar and berries. Ironically, our area is behind in rainfall, so the birds are looking for water. They've been at the dripper baths, stream bed, and bubbler and even taking turns in the sprinkler when we're watering the plants. Here are some of the highlights.

 

 

10-2-22 Blackburnian Warbler10-2-22 Blackburnian Warbler

10-6-22 Blackburnian Warbler10-6-22 Blackburnian Warbler

 

Blackburnian Warblers have been part of these flocks. The first year male has a bit darker eye line and a very yellow throat!

  10-6-22 Two Tennessee Warbler females with Blackburnian Warbler female10-6-22 Two Tennessee Warbler females with Blackburnian Warbler female

 

First fall female Blackburnian Warbler is a bit faded looking in comparison. It is on the right of these two female Tennessee Warblers.

 

10-5-22 Blackburnian Warbler female10-5-22 Blackburnian Warbler female

 

In studying the guides, I believe this is an adult female Blackburnian with an orangey tinge to the yellow in the throat. That's an American Goldfinch in the lower right corner.

 

9-24-22 Ovenbird9-24-22 Ovenbird

 

An Ovenbird, also a warbler, made full use of the bubbler on the day it came in.

 

9-25-22 Black-throated Green Warbler9-25-22 Black-throated Green Warbler

 

Black-throated Green Warblers have been consistently seen.

 

9-25-22 Magnolia and Chestnut-sided Warblers9-25-22 Magnolia and Chestnut-sided Warblers

 

Magnolia and Chestnut-sided Warblers were bathing buddies.

 

9-26-22 Two Magnolia and Tennessee Warblers9-26-22 Two Magnolia and Tennessee Warblers

 

Two Magnolia Warblers flank a Tennessee Warble on the bubbler rock.

 

10-1-22 Magnolia Warbler10-1-22 Magnolia Warbler

 

This Magnolia Warbler gave a great view of its underside while it perched on Solomon's Seal (Polygonatum biflorum).

 


9-26-22 Black-throated Green, Nashville and Tennessee Warblers9-26-22 Black-throated Green, Nashville and Tennessee Warblers

 

(Clockwise from left) Black-throated Green, Tennessee and Nashville Warblers decide their next moves.

 

9-28-22 Northern Parula9-28-22 Northern Parula

 

A Northern Parula feels most at home at the bubble in back.

 

9-30-22 Nashville and Tennessee Warblers9-30-22 Nashville and Tennessee Warblers

 

Nashville and Tennessee Warblers are often seen traveling together and can be confusing. The Nashville has the white eye rings.

 

10-1-22 Tennessee and Chestnut-sided Warblers10-1-22 Tennessee and Chestnut-sided Warblers

 

The Tennessee Warbler is the most common of the group, and chums it up here with a Chestnut-sided Warbler in the stream bed.

 

10-6-22 FOS Orange-crowned Warbler first fall female10-6-22 FOS Orange-crowned Warbler first fall female

 

One of my favorite birds, this first fall female Orange-crowned Warbler is a bit on the dull and dingy side of plumage coloration.


10-6-22 FOS Orange-crowned Warbler first fall female10-6-22 FOS Orange-crowned Warbler first fall female
10-6-22 FOS Orange-crowned Warbler first fall female10-6-22 FOS Orange-crowned Warbler first fall female 10-6-22 Tennessee Warbler and FOS Orange-crowned Warbler first fall female10-6-22 Tennessee Warbler and FOS Orange-crowned Warbler first fall female

 

After taking over 100 images, the little bird showed a bit of its often concealed orange crown! And, of course, it's with a female Tennessee Warbler.

 

10-2-22 Ruby-throated Hummingbird at Black-and-blue Salvia10-2-22 Ruby-throated Hummingbird at Black-and-blue Salvia

 

Immature Ruby-throated Hummingbirds are still being seen occasionally, this one nectared at Black-and-blue Salvia. (Not a native plant but full of nectar for hummers at this point in fall.)

 

  10-4-22 Ruby-crowned Kinglet10-4-22 Ruby-crowned Kinglet

 

Ruby-crowned Kinglets are often flitting about.

 

10-5-22 Red-breasted Nuthatch10-5-22 Red-breasted Nuthatch

10-2-22 Red-breasted Nuthatch10-2-22 Red-breasted Nuthatch

 

Red-breasted Nuthatches have been heard and seen, it seems there are two around right now. A pair stayed all last winter, so maybe we'll get lucky again this year.

 

10-4-22 FOS Summer Tanager10-4-22 FOS Summer Tanager 10-7-22 Summer Tanager10-7-22 Summer Tanager

 

Summer Tanagers have enjoyed the dripper bath and the bubbler rock.

 

10-5-22 Least Flycatcher10-5-22 Least Flycatcher

9-29-22 Eastern Phoebe9-29-22 Eastern Phoebe

 

Flycatchers have been active. A late Least Flycatcher, the grayest of the Empid group, and an Eastern Phoebe have been in the swampy thicket finding insects to eat.

 

9-25-22 Red-eyed Vireo immature9-25-22 Red-eyed Vireo immature

10-6-22 Blue-headed Vireo10-6-22 Blue-headed Vireo

10-6-22 Blue-headed Vireo10-6-22 Blue-headed Vireo

 

Red-eyed and Blue-headed Vireos love splash-bathing in the bubbler basin and pond.


 

10-2-22 Brown Thrasher eating American Beautyberries10-2-22 Brown Thrasher eating American Beautyberries 10-5-22 Rose-breasted Grosbeak eating American Beautyberries10-5-22 Rose-breasted Grosbeak eating American Beautyberries 10-5-22 American Robin  eating American Beautyberries10-5-22 American Robin eating American Beautyberries

 

American Beautyberries (Callicarpa americana) are taken by many species, including a Brown Thrasher, female Rose-breasted Grosbeak and an American Robin.

 

10-7-22 FOS Brown Creeper10-7-22 FOS Brown Creeper 10-7-22 FOS Brown Creeper10-7-22 FOS Brown Creeper 10-7-22 FOS Brown Creeper10-7-22 FOS Brown Creeper

 

Our FOS Brown Creeper arrived yesterday, 10-7-22. It was quick to investigate the bubbler area, bathe and then politely left its fecal deposit away from the water. Many of the birds do this! They appreciate clean water!

 

Have a nice cuppa and enjoy all the photos!

 

To see all the September birds since 9-23-22, the first full day of fall: September birds

 

To continue with October birds:  October birds

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Late September, Part One on 9-30-22

September 30, 2022  •  Leave a Comment

Part One: 9/16-9/23/22

 

As usual, when the birds really start coming in, I get behind! Here are some highlights from the third week of September.

 

9-16-22 Ruby-throated Hummingbird immature9-16-22 Ruby-throated Hummingbird immature 9-16-22 Ruby-throated Hummingbird9-16-22 Ruby-throated Hummingbird 9-19-22 Ruby-throated Hummingbird immature9-19-22 Ruby-throated Hummingbird immature

 

We're still seeing Ruby-throated Hummingbirds, but it seems the males have moved on. The second photo was taken on 9/16/22 and a male  was seen the next day. The immature birds investigate everything, bubbler included!

 

9=18-22 Carolina Chickadee with caterpillar on Virginia Creeper9=18-22 Carolina Chickadee with caterpillar on Virginia Creeper

 

All the birds are looking for food, like this Carolina Chickadee that found a caterpillar on leaves of Virginia Creeper(Parthenocissus quinquefolia).

 

9-18-22 Swainson's Thrushes9-18-22 Swainson's Thrushes 9-20-22 House Wren9-20-22 House Wren 9-20-22 American Redstart9-20-22 American Redstart 9-21-22 Black-throated Green Warbler9-21-22 Black-throated Green Warbler

 

Swainson's Thrushes were at the bubbler often one day. A House Wren found a little corner of the basin to drink from and splash in. Perhaps, it felt some protection from that stick overhead? American Redstarts and Black-throated Green Warblers have been seen on numerous days.

  9-22-22 Cooper's Hawk immature9-22-22 Cooper's Hawk immature

 

On the first full day of Fall, 9/22/22, this immature Cooper's Hawk took in the sights and sounds at the bubbler, ensuring that NO birds would dare come around. It finally left and the brave little birds came back. Five warbler species came in that day.

 

9-22-22 Magnolia Warbler9-22-22 Magnolia Warbler 9-22-22 Northern Parula9-22-22 Northern Parula 9-22-22 Chestnut-sided Warbler9-22-22 Chestnut-sided Warbler 9-22-22 FOS Golden-winged Warbler female9-22-22 FOS Golden-winged Warbler female

 

I missed the American Redstart, but was able to catch the Magnolia, Northern Parula and Chestnut-sided. The last warbler was this FOS female Golden-winged. I have yet to see another, very unusual as this species is reliably seen here. It is our most endangered species, and I can only hope they are finding what they need elsewhere.

 

9-22-22 Carolina Chickadee9-22-22 Carolina Chickadee

 

"Hey, birds!"

On Friday, 9/23/22, between 10:37 and 10:46 am, multiple birds of nine warbler species came in along with Ruby-crowned Kinglets and Red-eyed Vireos. They were popping in and out like popcorn! 

 

9-23-22 American Redstart9-23-22 American Redstart

 

American Redstart, immature male (really orangey yellow flanks)

 

9-23-22 FOS Nashville, two Tennessee and Chestnut-sided Warblers9-23-22 FOS Nashville, two Tennessee and Chestnut-sided Warblers

 

Clockwise from top left:  FOS Nashville Warbler, two Tennessee Warblers and Chestnut-sided Warbler 

 

9-23-22 Bay-breasted Warbler and American Redstart9-23-22 Bay-breasted Warbler and American Redstart

 

Bay-breasted Warbler and American Redstart

  9-23-22 Bay-breasted and Black-throated Green Warblers9-23-22 Bay-breasted and Black-throated Green Warblers

 

Bay-breasted and Black-throated Green Warblers

  9-23-22 Black-throated Green and Bay-breasted Warblers9-23-22 Black-throated Green and Bay-breasted Warblers

 

Two Black-throated Green and Bay-breasted Warblers

 

9-23-22 Bay-breasted Warbler and Northern Parula9-23-22 Bay-breasted Warbler and Northern Parula

 

Bay-breasted Warbler and Northern Parula

 

9-23-22 House Finch, Northern Parula and Magnolia Warbler9-23-22 House Finch, Northern Parula and Magnolia Warbler

 

Northern Parula at bubble, Magnolia Warbler and House Finch in foreground


9-23-22 Bay-breasted, Tennessee, Northern Parula and Black-throated Green Warblers9-23-22 Bay-breasted, Tennessee, Northern Parula and Black-throated Green Warblers

 

Rear to foreground:  Bay-breasted, Tennessee, Northern Parula and Black-throated Green Warblers

 

9-23-22 Red-eyed Vireo immature9-23-22 Red-eyed Vireo immature

 

Red-eyed Vireo, immature with brown eye

 

9-23-22 Magnolia Warbler9-23-22 Magnolia Warbler

 

Magnolia Warbler (tail dipped in ink)

 

9-23-22 Ruby-crowned Kinglet with insect9-23-22 Ruby-crowned Kinglet with insect

 

And last but not least, a Ruby-crowned Kinglet with insect legs hanging out of its mouth! Gotta love it! This is what it's all about, nourishing the birds with the insect foods they need by attracting the insects with native plants.

 

Check back in a few days, I hope to have the last week of September highlights added in by then!

 

 

 


Mid-September update 9-16-22

September 16, 2022  •  Leave a Comment

It has been a bit slower than most falls, yet there are some interesting sightings to share!

 

9-7-22 Eastern Bluebird9-7-22 Eastern Bluebird 9-7-22 Eastern Bluebird fledglings9-7-22 Eastern Bluebird fledglings

 

Eastern Bluebirds have taken to coming to the dripper baths in the afternoons. Some days, I'll see six or seven of them taking turns.

  9-8-22 Magnolia Warbler9-8-22 Magnolia Warbler 9-8-22 Magnolia Warbler9-8-22 Magnolia Warbler 9-8-22 Magnolia Warbler9-8-22 Magnolia Warbler

 

Magnolia Warblers have come in several days. One doesn't always get to see the whole bird, but with this species, if one sees the tail and it has this feature, it is considered unique, diagnostic or Dx for Magnolia Warbler.

 

9-10-22 American Robins9-10-22 American Robins

 

Ahead of a major cool front on 9/10/22, 28 species of birds came into the yard and to the water features. There had to be150 American Robins that day. It was a constant stream of them with three in the basin, and four or five more waiting in the wings at times.

 

9-10-22 Rose-breasted Grosbeak immature9-10-22 Rose-breasted Grosbeak immature
9-10-22 Rose-breasted Grosbeak immature, Northern Flicker and American Robin9-10-22 Rose-breasted Grosbeak immature, Northern Flicker and American Robin

 

A young Rose-breasted Grosbeak wanted a turn! It had to beg for a drink from this Northern Flicker, which had displaced the robins for a bit.

  9-10-22 Magnolia Warbler9-10-22 Magnolia Warbler

9-10-22 Magnolia Warbler9-10-22 Magnolia Warbler

 

What bird is this? Yes, another Magnolia Warbler was in the mix.

 

9-10-22 Yellow-billed Cuckoo9-10-22 Yellow-billed Cuckoo 9-10-22 Yellow-billed Cuckoo9-10-22 Yellow-billed Cuckoo 9-10-22 Yellow-billed Cuckoo9-10-22 Yellow-billed Cuckoo 9-10-22 Yellow-billed Cuckoo9-10-22 Yellow-billed Cuckoo

 

Now, we sure don't see this very often! A Yellow-billed Cuckoo slipped down through the canopy to bathe at the sump puddle. This bird had its own 'cuckoo' version of the hokey-pokey! It plopped into a tight spot at the edge, spun a half-turn, splashed a bit, spun again and kept this up for a few minutes before perching to shake off. I only remember a few times that I've seen this species come to water. Remarkable flair, eh?

 

  9-10-22 Red-eyed Vireo9-10-22 Red-eyed Vireo

9-10-22 Red-eyed Vireo immature9-10-22 Red-eyed Vireo immature

 

Red-eyed Vireos were in this mixed flock. The adult has red eyes, the immature bird in the second photo has brown eyes. 

 

9-10-22 Northern Parula female9-10-22 Northern Parula female

9-10-22 Northern Parula female9-10-22 Northern Parula female

 

There were several Northern Parulas, two males and this female. All spent time foraging in the native hydrangeas (Hydrangea arborescens).

 

  9-10-22 FOS Cedar Waxwing immature Bubbler #879-10-22 FOS Cedar Waxwing immature Bubbler #87 9-10-22 FOS Cedar Waxwing immature Bubbler #879-10-22 FOS Cedar Waxwing immature Bubbler #87 9-10-22 FOS Cedar Waxwing immature Bubbler #879-10-22 FOS Cedar Waxwing immature Bubbler #87

 

Two FOS Cedar Waxwings came down near the bubbler. The adult left this immature bird to figure out how to get a drink on its own. This happens often with different species. Cardinals, robins, wrens, etc. will drop off the young birds, leaving them for a life lesson. It reminds me of the "Mother's Day Out" programs when our kids were in nursery school! I'm humbled to think the birds seem to feel some trust in the safety of our sanctuary.

 

 

9-13-22 Tennessee Warbler and Carolina Chickadee9-13-22 Tennessee Warbler and Carolina Chickadee 9-13-22 Tennessee Warbler and Carolina Chickadee9-13-22 Tennessee Warbler and Carolina Chickadee 9-13-22 Tennessee Warbler, Carolina Chickadee and House Finch9-13-22 Tennessee Warbler, Carolina Chickadee and House Finch 9-13-22 Tennessee Warbler  and House Finch9-13-22 Tennessee Warbler and House Finch

 

A Carolina Chickadee was not happy that a Tennessee Warbler was at 'his' bubbler! Eventually, all three birds got what they needed.

 

9-13-22 Magnolia Warbler9-13-22 Magnolia Warbler

 

QUIZ BIRD! (Easy-peasy)

 

4-1-22 Red-breasted Nuthatch4-1-22 Red-breasted Nuthatch

 

Yesterday, I heard the 'little toy horn' of a Red-breasted Nuthatch! It was another 30 minutes before I saw it, working along a branch of the pond cypress. This photo is one I took in April, but it will have to serve until this little guy comes back again. Hopefully, we'll be seeing them this winter. They always bring a smile!

 

9-15-22 Eastern Bluebirds9-15-22 Eastern Bluebirds 9-15-22 Eastern Bluebirds9-15-22 Eastern Bluebirds 9-15-22 Eastern Bluebirds9-15-22 Eastern Bluebirds

 

Yesterday afternoon, the Eastern Bluebirds were back. One did NOT want this male to come near 'his' dripper! So, squabbles happen between the same species, too. There's always something!

 

The heat is on with temperatures going back up into the upper 90's next week.

When will we see some more migrants, is Fall really here yet?

 

 

 

 

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