Never-ending story! 5-18-20

May 18, 2020  •  1 Comment

This is proving to be a memorable migration for those birding in the St. Louis area. The NW winds and cool weather have impeded the progress of the migrants. They need warm, southerly winds to help them in their travels north. So, they are here, feeding voraciously in every migrant trap like Tower Grove Park, Forest Park, and in our sanctuary, too.

 

To begin, a lovely Mourning Warbler was here on 'Big Day', 5-9-20. This bird has alway been a bit of a nemesis for me. I was able to get lovely looks at it early that morning. When I followed it and tried to get this photo, well, of course, the bird did not cooperate. "Not fair!" Especially not fair when this bird is the one that made such a difference in my habits. The old story will open on a new page:

This Birder's Tale

 

 Belated Happy Mother's Day to all the moms!

 

5-9-20 Mourning Warbler, not cooperating5-9-20 Mourning Warbler, not cooperating

 

Many species of warblers have been here this past week. It has been a super challenge to keep up, and they're still here! Golden-winged Warblers have continued to be seen nearly every day. One finally visited the basin.

 

5-9-20 Golden-winged Warbler5-9-20 Golden-winged Warbler 5-9-20 Golden-winged Warbler5-9-20 Golden-winged Warbler

 

A huge surprise was having a second female Cerulean Warbler also come in on 5-9-20. It came to check out the bubbler, the closest a Cerulean has ever gotten to the water. What a lovely bird, and such a rarity!

 

5-9-20 Cerulean Warbler female (second of the spring!)5-9-20 Cerulean Warbler female (second of the spring!) 5-9-20 Cerulean Warbler female (second of the spring!)5-9-20 Cerulean Warbler female (second of the spring!) 5-9-20 Cerulean Warbler female (second of the spring!)5-9-20 Cerulean Warbler female (second of the spring!)

 

Bay-breasted Warblers first showed up on 5-7-20 but they have been here on nine days since then. These are uncommon migrants.

 

5-10-20 Bay-breasted Warbler5-10-20 Bay-breasted Warbler 5-10-20 Bay-breasted Warbler5-10-20 Bay-breasted Warbler 5-11-20 Bay-breasted Warbler5-11-20 Bay-breasted Warbler

 

Magnolia Warblers began to show up on 5-7-20 and have been here on at least seven different days. They are striking birds.

 

5-15-20 Magnolia Warbler on American Elm (Ulmus Americana)5-15-20 Magnolia Warbler on American Elm (Ulmus Americana)

 

5-16-20 Magnolia Warbler5-16-20 Magnolia Warbler 5-16-20 Magnolia Warbler5-16-20 Magnolia Warbler

 

There has been a lot of 'bubble magic' lately. This Black-and-white Warbler claimed ownership of the bubble with a Northern Parula and a female Golden-winged Warbler.

 

5-16-20 Black-and-white Warbler and Northern Parula5-16-20 Black-and-white Warbler and Northern Parula 5-16-20 Black-and-white Warbler and Golden-winged Warbler female5-16-20 Black-and-white Warbler and Golden-winged Warbler female 5-16-20 Black-and-white Warbler and Golden-winged Warbler female5-16-20 Black-and-white Warbler and Golden-winged Warbler female

 

I've been hoping this quick moving little Wilson's Warbler would be enticed to come in close. Once they do, they seem to stay in the water and fully enjoy it.

 

5-16-20 Wilson's Warbler5-16-20 Wilson's Warbler 5-16-20 Wilson's Warbler5-16-20 Wilson's Warbler 5-16-20 Wilson's Warbler and Chestnut-sided Warbler5-16-20 Wilson's Warbler and Chestnut-sided Warbler

 

We all have our favorites, but I think the female Bay-breasted is such a richly colored bird.

 

5-16-20 Bay-breasted Warbler female5-16-20 Bay-breasted Warbler female 5-16-20 Bay-breasted Warbler female5-16-20 Bay-breasted Warbler female 5-16-20 Bay-breasted Warbler female5-16-20 Bay-breasted Warbler female 5-16-20 Bay-breasted Warbler female5-16-20 Bay-breasted Warbler female

 

This Northern Parula and Tennessee Warbler had their own version of a tango to dance.


5-16-20 Northern Parula and Tennessee Warbler5-16-20 Northern Parula and Tennessee Warbler

5-16-20 Tennessee Warbler and Northern Parula5-16-20 Tennessee Warbler and Northern Parula

5-16-20 Tennessee Warbler and Northern Parula5-16-20 Tennessee Warbler and Northern Parula
5-16-20 Tennessee Warbler and Northern Parula5-16-20 Tennessee Warbler and Northern Parula

 

Last Monday, on 5-11-20, the warblers and a few others, like a Gray Catbird, had to make way for Cedar Waxwings. The flock has been coming in to the Pondcypress (Taxodium ascenders) and feeding heavily on tiny larvae. It's a messy business. No wonder they needed to bathe!

 

5-11-20 Cedar Waxwing5-11-20 Cedar Waxwing

5-11-20 Cedar Waxwings

5-11-20 Cedar Waxwing5-11-20 Cedar Waxwing

 

To view all the best images since the last post, sit back, relax with a cuppa and start the slideshow: 

Birds since 5-9-20

 

 

 

 


Comments

John Curran(non-registered)
Love all the photos. I enjoy looking at the native plants in the photos. Your blog is inspiration for building up the bird habitat in my yard with natives and moving water.
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