Into April now! 4-4-2024

April 04, 2024  •  Leave a Comment

 

Nesting is serious business! 

 

3-22-24 Carolina Chickadee brings moss to the nest box3-22-24 Carolina Chickadee brings moss to the nest box 3-24-24 Carolina Chickadee3-24-24 Carolina Chickadee 3-28-24 Carolina Chickadee3-28-24 Carolina Chickadee
3-30-24 Carolina Chickadee nest with one egg3-30-24 Carolina Chickadee nest with one egg

The Carolina Chickadees have been busy finishing their nest and on 3-30-24 there was one egg cradled deep inside. It's the creamy speckled one just to the left of center. The moss was embellished with soft alpaca fibers that were pulled from the grapevine ball, an idea that I put together for holiday gifts. Chickadees are one species that will use rabbit fur to line their nests, so I thought they might like this. I was very curious to see what other birds might take some. 

 

3-30-24 Carolina Chickadee drives off pari of Eurasian Tree Sparrows3-30-24 Carolina Chickadee drives off pari of Eurasian Tree Sparrows 3-30-24 Carolina Chickadee drives off Eurasian Tree Sparrow3-30-24 Carolina Chickadee drives off Eurasian Tree Sparrow Now that egg-laying has begun, the pair must defend their nest. The Eurasian Tree Sparrows can barely stick their heads through the hole, but they harass the smaller birds. We hope the chickadees are successful.

NOTE: I call "our" chickadees "Carolina Chickadees" because they have always sounded and looked to me like that species. It is more complicated than that! A recent discussion on the MOBirds Listserve indicated that neither song nor morphological characteristics are good indicators of whether a chickadee is Black-capped, Carolina or mixed ancestry in the hybrid zone. More information at a later date...

 

Back to the birds!


3-22-24 Eastern Phoebe with insect3-22-24 Eastern Phoebe with insect 3-27-24 Eastern Phoebe3-27-24 Eastern Phoebe 3-28-24 Eastern Phoebe with alpaca fibers3-28-24 Eastern Phoebe with alpaca fibers 3-28-24 Eastern Phoebe with alpaca fibers3-28-24 Eastern Phoebe with alpaca fibers 3-28-24 Eastern Phoebe with alpaca fibers3-28-24 Eastern Phoebe with alpaca fibers

The Eastern Phoebes have been catching insects as temperatures have been warm. The female seemed to like the available fibers, too!

 

3-25-24 Pine Siskins, green morph3-25-24 Pine Siskins, green morph 3-25-24 Pine Siskin, green morph in Blackhaw Viburnum3-25-24 Pine Siskin, green morph in Blackhaw Viburnum 3-26-24 Pine Siskin, green morph and American Goldfinch3-26-24 Pine Siskin, green morph and American Goldfinch

The green morph Pine Siskin has been at the feeder some days. That bird is almost as bright as the male American Goldfinches are right now.

  3-29-24 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker with red nape3-29-24 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker with red nape 3-29-24 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker with red nape3-29-24 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker with red nape 3-29-24 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker with red nape3-29-24 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker with red nape

This Yellow-bellied Sapsucker was spotted on trees in the swampy thicket. In the first photo, one can see that it has a red nape. A few years ago, there was a similar bird that I photographed and submitted as a possible hybrid. After experts reviewed the photos, it was decided to be a Yellow-bellied Sapsucker.  I do wonder if it's the same bird.

   4-1-24 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker on Shagbark Hickory4-1-24 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker on Shagbark Hickory 4-1-24 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker4-1-24 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 4-1-24 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker4-1-24 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

This bird is typical, with only white on the nape feathers, it's another male Yellow-bellied Sapsucker. It was tapping the Shagbark Hickory for sap to drink  before checking out the Bubbler.

 

3-29-24 Eastern Bluebird eggs3-29-24 Eastern Bluebird eggs 4-1-24 Eastern Bluebird pair4-1-24 Eastern Bluebird pair

The Eastern Bluebirds took time to get a quick bath together. At last count, four eggs were in the nest. The female may lay another, typically there are five to a brood.

  3-28-24 Cedar Waxwings3-28-24 Cedar Waxwings 3-28-24 Cedar Waxwings3-28-24 Cedar Waxwings 4-1-24 Cedar Waxwings4-1-24 Cedar Waxwings

Cedar Waxwings have been coming in to bathe, with sometimes as many as ten or twelve in the basin together. I noticed the orange tail tip in this last photo, which indicates this bird has been eating a lot of berries from the invasive Bush Honeysuckle.

  3-31-24 Pine Siskin and Yellow-rumped Warbler3-31-24 Pine Siskin and Yellow-rumped Warbler 4-1-24 Yellow-rumped Warbler, molting4-1-24 Yellow-rumped Warbler, molting 4-1-24 Yellow-rumped Warbler, molting4-1-24 Yellow-rumped Warbler, molting

There have been quite a few different Yellow-rumped Warblers in the woods. That's a Pine Siskin with a male warbler in the first photo, and the next two are scruffy little guys molting their feathers into spring plumage.

  4-2-24 FOY #49 Chipping Sparrow4-2-24 FOY #49 Chipping Sparrow

One new arrival is a Chipping Sparrow. It has been seen at feeders around the yard, and perched, like so in the Spicebush (Lindera benzoin).

 

5-1-20 Blackburnian Warbler5-1-20 Blackburnian Warbler

Warbler Exhibit is Open for Viewing through Saturday, April 27, 2024!

Check the link for more information.

"Meet the Warblers!"

 

 

 

 


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