Spring! 4-4-21

April 04, 2021  •  Leave a Comment

Well, life is a miracle, and therefore infinitely of interest everywhere.

-Wendell Berry

 

3-11-21 Carolina Wren singing3-11-21 Carolina Wren singing

3-26-21 Eastern Phoebe in Spicebush (Lindera benzoin)3-26-21 Eastern Phoebe in Spicebush (Lindera benzoin)

 

Sure signs of spring, the song of the Carolina wren and an Eastern Phoebe, resting in a blooming Spicebush (Lindera benzoin).

 

3-30-21 FOY#46 Louisiana Waterthrush3-30-21 FOY#46 Louisiana Waterthrush 3-30-21 FOY#46 Louisiana Waterthrush3-30-21 FOY#46 Louisiana Waterthrush 3-30-21 FOY#46 Louisiana Waterthrush3-30-21 FOY#46 Louisiana Waterthrush 3-30-21 FOY#46 Louisiana Waterthrush3-30-21 FOY#46 Louisiana Waterthrush 3-30-21 FOY#46 Louisiana Waterthrush3-30-21 FOY#46 Louisiana Waterthrush

 

Our first warbler of the year and one that I missed last year, arrived on March 30. The Louisiana Waterthrush, with its slow sway and 'bubblegum' legs, foraged, finding insects for twenty minutes or so in the wetland. Another was heard singing a few days later, but it played hide and seek in the swale.

 

3-27-21 Bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis)3-27-21 Bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis) 3-30-21 Mayapple (Podophyllum peildatum)3-30-21 Mayapple (Podophyllum peildatum)

 

Bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis) has been blooming and Mayapple (Podophyllum peltatum) will be in another week or so. The hard freeze of the first two nights of April caused no damage that I could find to our native plants. They're tough, resilient and built to endure these swings in temperature.

 

3-30-21 Virginia Bluebells (Mertensia Virginia)3-30-21 Virginia Bluebells (Mertensia Virginia) 3-30-21 Virginia Bluebells (Mertensia Virginia)3-30-21 Virginia Bluebells (Mertensia Virginia)

 

Ephemerals like Virginia Bluebells (Mertensia virginica) may have shivered and sneezed in that cold, but they look lush and ready to bloom. 

 

3-31-21 Red Buckeye (Aesculus pavia)3-31-21 Red Buckeye (Aesculus pavia)

 

While weeding, I discovered a new seedling Red Buckeye (Aesculus pavia), a nice distance from its parent plant. Leaving the fallen leaves in the beds has provided the perfect conditions for the new tree. 

 

4-1-21 Pine Siskins4-1-21 Pine Siskins 4-2-21 Pine Siskins4-2-21 Pine Siskins

 

At least one pair of Pine Siskins have been around continuously through the cold. Yesterday at noon, there were six briefly on a feeder. 

 

' 4-1-21 American Goldfinch4-1-21 American Goldfinch 4-1-21 American Goldfinch foraging on American Elm seeds4-1-21 American Goldfinch foraging on American Elm seeds

 

American Goldfinches are going through their spring molt and looking brighter every day. They are often seen foraging on the American Elm seed clusters, along with the Pine Siskins.

 

4-1-21 Northern Cardinals pair-bonding4-1-21 Northern Cardinals pair-bonding

 

Courting a female Northern Cardinal includes bringing treats, though this bird just wanted some private spa time!

 

4-4-21 FOY #49 Winter Wren4-4-21 FOY #49 Winter Wren 4-4-21 FOY #49 Winter Wren4-4-21 FOY #49 Winter Wren 4-4-21 FOY #49 Winter Wren4-4-21 FOY #49 Winter Wren

 

This morning, our FOY #49 arrived, a tiny Winter Wren. Mouse-like and quick, it sure seemed to know its way around our woodland. Welcome, friend! More migrants will be on the move now so keep a lookout!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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