Ruby-throated Hummingbird on garden arborRuby-throated Hummingbird on garden arborOne of many ruby-throated hummingbirds in our garden rests on the garden arbor.

Welcome to our blog! It's all about our discoveries here in our Shady Oaks yard, a Sanctuary for birds and other wildlife. We began to restore habitat for wildlife here in 1996 and gauge our success by the diversity of species we observe and document with our photography. We hope you enjoy our images and come back often to see what's new! 

Into August now 8-7-17

August 07, 2017  •  Leave a Comment

Since the last post, there have been quite a few sightings.  A worn Great Crested Flycatcher was busy looking for food for its fledgling on Tuesday, July 25.  The younger bird looks bright and alert with more white on its feather edges.  Such fun to see this species nesting here.

 

Great Crested Flycatcher 7-25-17Great Crested Flycatcher 7-25-17 Great Crested Flycatcher adult feeding juvenile 7-25-17Great Crested Flycatcher adult feeding juvenile 7-25-17 Great Crested Flycatcher juvenile 7-25-17Great Crested Flycatcher juvenile 7-25-17

 

A female Monarch was seen on Friday, July 28 laying eggs on the Marsh Milkweed (Asclepias tuberosa).  I watched the butterfly work through the garden for about an hour and it finally took a break to nectar on freshly opened blossoms.

 

Monarch female lays eggs on Marsh Milkweed 7-28-17Monarch female lays eggs on Marsh Milkweed 7-28-17

Monarch female nectars on Marsh Milkweed 7-28-17Monarch female nectars on Marsh Milkweed 7-28-17

 

The next day, a female Blue Dasher took a rest on a spent Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea).  How beautiful it was in the soft light as its coloring blended in with the spiky seed head.

 

Blue Dasher female 7-29-17Blue Dasher female 7-29-17

 

On Sunday, July 30, a Painted Lady was busy nectaring in the garden, mainly on the coneflowers.  It was my first opportunity to photograph this uncommon butterfly here.

 

Painted Lady (uncommon) on Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) 7-30-17Painted Lady (uncommon) on Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) 7-30-17

Painted Lady (uncommon) on Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) 7-30-17Painted Lady (uncommon) on Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) 7-30-17

 

As I followed the butterfly, I noticed a Tufted Titmouse flying down to the garden and briefly laying down, not dust-bathing but sun-bathing.  Another Titmouse joined it, literally laying on top and giving it a hug!  Isn't that interesting behavior?

 

Pair of Tufted Titmice sunbathing in garden cover 7-30-17Pair of Tufted Titmice sunbathing in garden cover 7-30-17

 

They would pop up to a tree branch for a while and down to the garden again, only staying maybe 30 seconds.  This went on for several minutes.  One tried the bench but that just wasn't the same.

 

Tufted Titmouse sunbathing on bench 7-30-17Tufted Titmouse sunbathing on bench 7-30-17 Tufted Titmouse sunbathing in garden cover 7-30-17Tufted Titmouse sunbathing in garden cover 7-30-17 Tufted Titmouse sunbathing in garden cover 7-30-17Tufted Titmouse sunbathing in garden cover 7-30-17

 

A Great Crested Flycatcher got in on the act and I also saw a Ruby-throated Hummingbird lay down for just a few seconds.  Look closely as the flycatcher nestled in under the coneflowers near the basil.  It had been very cool overnight at 60 degrees so perhaps they were indeed just soaking up a bit of warmth in anticipation of another cool night.

 

Great Crested Flycatcher sunbathing in garden cover 7-30--17Great Crested Flycatcher sunbathing in garden cover 7-30--17

 

The cool weather brought in more Ruby-throated Hummingbirds and they have been chasing each other through the garden.  The Cardinal flower is nestled in between patches of milkweed and coneflowers and not nearly as tall.  The birds find its bright red blossoms nonetheless.

 

Ruby-throated Hummingbird at Cardinal flower (Lobelia cardinalis) 8-5-17Ruby-throated Hummingbird at Cardinal flower (Lobelia cardinalis) 8-5-17

 

Today, one of the young hummingbirds had a chance to drink from a plant near the pond, much closer to where I was waiting.  Fascinating to capture the pollen being deposited on its head as it thrust its bill into the blossom.  See the tiny yellow grain of pollen falling away?  Bird and plant are perfectly compatible.

 

Ruby-throated Hummingbird pollinating Cardinal flower (Lobelia cardinalis) 8-7-17Ruby-throated Hummingbird pollinating Cardinal flower (Lobelia cardinalis) 8-7-17

 

A Coopers Hawk has been in the woods on several different days.  It was perched near the Bubbler on Tuesday, August 1.

 

Coopers Hawk 8-1-17Coopers Hawk 8-1-17

 

A Northern Flicker got in to get a good bath the next day when the hawk wasn't around.

 

Northern Flicker 8-2-17Northern Flicker 8-2-17

 

It was Thursday, August 3.  As often happens, I thought I saw the Painted Lady again and by the time I got the camera, I could not re-find it.  I waited on the landing and the Carolina Wren started fussing up a storm.  It circled around me and into the thicket.  I went up to the deck to see what the problem might be and didn't see anything at first.

 

Carolina Wren calling in alarm 8-3-17Carolina Wren calling in alarm 8-3-17

 

Then, the Coopers Hawk dropped in and stared down the wren.  The wren moved on but by then, the birds had heard and heeded the alarm.

 

Coopers Hawk 8-3-17Coopers Hawk 8-3-17

 

Before 7 a.m. on Friday morning, August 4, the twin fawns were in the woodland, grooming themselves.  I guess that's where they had spent the night.  Here is one of the fawns before they moved on.

  White-tailed Fawn #2 8-4-17White-tailed Fawn #2 8-4-17

 

A black female Tiger Swallowtail has been in the garden the last few days.  

 

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail black female 8-5-17Eastern Tiger Swallowtail black female 8-5-17

 

This afternoon, a male Monarch was very active on the Marsh Milkweed.  It was only when I finished going through the images that I saw a tiny Monarch caterpillar in this photo, too!  Can you find it?  The caterpillars are able to eat every part of the plant to grow into a healthy butterfly.  What a positive ending to the day!

 

Monarch adult and caterpillar on Marsh Milkweed 8-7-17Monarch adult and caterpillar on Marsh Milkweed 8-7-17

Hint:  Look in the cluster of buds on the far right for the tiny striped caterpillar.  Eggs were laid on Friday, July 28 so the caterpillar is 10 days old.

 

 

 

 

 


Summertime! 7-19-17

July 19, 2017  •  Leave a Comment

The heat is on!  We have lost 20 minutes of daylight since the Summer Solstice last month, but that fact sure hasn't lessened the temperatures. To help out the birds, we added a new dripper to an old birdbath and it has been getting a lot of attention.

 

Woodard Dripper Bath 7-15-17Woodard Dripper Bath 7-15-17

 

A young American Robin investigated it, took a bath and then took a nap one hot afternoon.

 

American Robin juvenile at Dripper Bath 7-11-17 temperature at 99 FarenheitAmerican Robin juvenile at Dripper Bath 7-11-17 temperature at 99 Farenheit American Robin juvenile at Dripper Bath 7-11-17 temperature at 99 FarenheitAmerican Robin juvenile at Dripper Bath 7-11-17 temperature at 99 Farenheit

 

Tufted Timice and Chickadees come to get a sip at the little spouts on both dripper baths.

 

Tufted Titmouse getting a drop of water 7-16-17Tufted Titmouse getting a drop of water 7-16-17

 

Water is a precious commodity in this heat for birds, animals and insects, like bees, too.

 

A precious drop of water 7-16-17A precious drop of water 7-16-17

 

 

So, you still haven't gotten around to adding a dripper to your birdbath?  It's really not difficult to do.  You can get the tubing and fittings from a 'big box' store if you're a DIY type or buy a kit.  Here's the scoop from an old blog post:

Moving Water for Birds

 

The doe and fawn were in the woodland before 7 a.m. last Wednesday morning, 7/12/17.  Perhaps that is where they had spent the night.  Their noses touched as they greeted each other.  The day would prove to be the hottest of the year so far at 101.8 degrees here.

 

7-12-17 Doe and Fawn at 6:57 am7-12-17 Doe and Fawn at 6:57 am

 

Some well-timed rain brought in a bit cooler air and the nectar seemed to call to the pollinators.  Butterflies are 'local foodies' and focus on the most productive blooms to nectar on at a given point in the season.  An Eastern Tiger Swallowtail passed up the buttonbush, which was juicy and sweet the week before, knowing the purple coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) was now at its peak.

 

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail on Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) 7-14-17Eastern Tiger Swallowtail on Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) 7-14-17 Eastern Tiger Swallowtail on Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) 7-14-17Eastern Tiger Swallowtail on Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) 7-14-17

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail on Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) 7-14-17Eastern Tiger Swallowtail on Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) 7-14-17

 

The bumblebees and even tiny ants were coming in to feed.

 

Bumblebees and Ants on Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) 7-14-17Bumblebees and Ants on Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) 7-14-17

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail on Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) 7-14-17Eastern Tiger Swallowtail on Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) 7-14-17

 

The next day at noon was much the same, with lots of activity.  A Silver-spotted Skipper finally took a moment to rest on a bloom.

 

Silver Spotted Skipper on Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) 7-15-17Silver Spotted Skipper on Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) 7-15-17

 

The Eastern Tiger Swallowtail was back amidst the sea of coneflowers, flitting about. 

 

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail on Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) 7-15-17Eastern Tiger Swallowtail on Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) 7-15-17

 

The tiger also tried the meadow phlox (Pholx maculata).

 

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail on Meadow Phlox (Phlox maculata) 7-15-17Eastern Tiger Swallowtail on Meadow Phlox (Phlox maculata) 7-15-17

 

Like a drunken sailor, it kept returning to the coneflowers.  It went deeper into the garden and as I took this image, a flash of orange appeared in front of my lens.

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail on Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) 7-15-17Eastern Tiger Swallowtail on Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) 7-15-17

 

 It was a Monarch, the first of the summer, a very fresh looking male!  I sent in my report with this photo to Journey North:  Journey North

 

Monarch on Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) 7-15-17Monarch on Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) 7-15-17

Monarch on Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) 7-15-17Monarch on Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) 7-15-17

Monarch on Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) 7-15-17Monarch on Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) 7-15-17

 

A Spicebush Swallowtail soon joined the parade of butterflies. It was such a nice summer day.

 

Spicebush Swallowtail on Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) 7-15-17Spicebush Swallowtail on Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) 7-15-17

 

A nice surprise this past week was catching a short video of a frisky, healthy fox as it pranced through the area of the bubbler.  It comes in on the upper left.

 

Fox! 7/16/17 at 5:47 a.m.

 

On Monday morning about 6 a.m., a ghostly figure moved through the woods.  It was mostly interested in finding insects in the leaf litter and didn't pay much attention to me.  The opossum moved under a spicebush a bit closer and looked up, then moseyed along its way.

 

Opossum in the woodland 7-17-17 at 6:04 amOpossum in the woodland 7-17-17 at 6:04 am

 

Later on in the garden, I noticed an insect I had not seen before.  The best i.d. I could find was that it is a type of Spear-winged Fly, Lonchoptera species.  If any of you naturalists or entomologists know this one, it would be nice to complete its identification.  And, I have no idea what it is carrying, either!

 

Spear-winged Fly species 7-17-17Spear-winged Fly species 7-17-17

 

An annual cicada was moving about and landed on a Marsh Milkweed (Asclepias incarnata) stalk.

 

Annual Cicada on Marsh Milkweed 7-17-17Annual Cicada on Marsh Milkweed 7-17-17

 

The Ruby-throated Hummingbirds have been chasing each other about and this female sipped some nectar at the Black and Blue Salvia.  It is not a native plant but it is a good nectar source with high sugar content.

 

Ruby-throated Hummingbird at Black and Blue Salvia 7-14-17Ruby-throated Hummingbird at Black and Blue Salvia 7-14-17

 

In the evenings, we watch the American Robins come in and feast on the Roughleaf Dogwood (Cornus drummondii) berries, another source of sweet moisture for hungry birds.  Even the young ones have figured out how to perch and reach for them.

 

American Robin juvenile with berry from Roughleaf Dogwood (Cornus drummondii) 7-16-17American Robin juvenile with berry from Roughleaf Dogwood (Cornus drummondii) 7-16-17

 

Temperatures will be beastly over the next four days, topping 100 degrees with high heat indices in the humidity.  It's summertime in St. Louis!

 

 

 

 


Babes! 7-8-17

July 08, 2017  •  Leave a Comment

The summer brings evidence of new life with lots of mouths to feed.  I returned to the yard with the hummingbird nest on June 22.  The birds were very active and feeding well. 

 

6-22-17 Ruby-throated Hummingbird chicks 10 days old6-22-17 Ruby-throated Hummingbird chicks 10 days old

 

Due to some rain and windy conditions, I was not able to go back for five days.  The homeowner told me on that morning that the chicks were 'beating each other up' and one was exercising its wings vigorously on the edge of the nest with just a toe holding on.  When I arrived a couple hours later, both birds were apparently...gone.  

 

6-27-17 Nest is empty?6-27-17 Nest is empty?

 

The female came in and seemed to be checking the nest.  The bird just rearranged some down and flew off, returned in a few minutes and did the same thing.  We listened for peeping and looked on other branches, but did not see the chicks anywhere.

 

6-27-17 Ruby-throated Hummingbird picks up downy fluff lining nest6-27-17 Ruby-throated Hummingbird picks up downy fluff lining nest

 

After a while, we confirmed that the nest was indeed empty.  By our calculations, it was day 15 but perhaps we were mistaken.  The earliest that chicks usually fledge is on day 18.  What happened to the birds is a mystery since no one witnessed their departure.  Young chicks are vulnerable and can become a meal for other larger birds, small mammals and even the larger non-native praying mantises.  We were left to hope for the best for these two little ruby-throats.

Here's one link on the non-native praying mantis:  Chinese Praying Mantis preys on Ruby-throats

 

6-27-17 Nest is empty, for certain6-27-17 Nest is empty, for certain

 

Back in our Shady Oaks yard, we're still seeing both male and female Ruby-throated Hummingbirds.  These two males were tanking up one afternoon, sharing somewhat tentatively at the same feeder.

 

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds 6-25-17Ruby-throated Hummingbirds 6-25-17

 

A young American Robin enjoyed the dripper bath on a hot day.  It has been a very popular place.

 

American Robin at dripper bath 6-29-17American Robin at dripper bath 6-29-17

 

This Eastern Wood Pewee was fly-catching right off the deck around noon on June 29.  I could hear it calling over my head later as I weeded on the path to the Bubbler. It might still be feeding young. 

 

Eastern Wood Pewee 6-29-17Eastern Wood Pewee 6-29-17

 

On Monday, June 26, this Northern Cardinal found an annual cicada to pre-digest for its brood.  

 

Northern Cardinal with annual cicada for nestlings 6-26-17Northern Cardinal with annual cicada for nestlings 6-26-17

 

It flew to the nearby viburnum then across the pond and up to its nest.  

 

Northern Cardinal with annual cicada for nestlings 6-26-17Northern Cardinal with annual cicada for nestlings 6-26-17

 

I think it's in this area, it is so well concealed in the Coral Trumpet Honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens) on the arbor.

 

Northern Cardinal nest in Coral Trumpet Honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens) 4-9-17Northern Cardinal nest in Coral Trumpet Honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens) 4-9-17

 

We had been hearing the chicks peeping while we were in the gazebo having a few meals.  The 4th of July became Independence Day for the chicks!  This one flew from the viburnum about 25 feet to the cypress!  Wide-eyed, it was taking in this big new world as the male brought in a morsel and gently fed it.

 

Northern Cardinal fledgling 7-4-17Northern Cardinal fledgling 7-4-17 Northern Cardinal fledgling with male 7-4-17Northern Cardinal fledgling with male 7-4-17 Northern Cardinal fledgling being fed by male 7-4-17Northern Cardinal fledgling being fed by male 7-4-17

 

The woodpecker group has had a good spring, too.  This young Red-bellied Woodpecker has already been in the Bubbler Basin to bathe.

 

Red-bellied Woodpecker juvenile 7-2-17Red-bellied Woodpecker juvenile 7-2-17

 

Baby birds of all sizes certainly look like their prehistoric ancestors!

 

Red-bellied Woodpecker juvenile 7-2-17Red-bellied Woodpecker juvenile 7-2-17

 

The Downy Woodpeckers have at least one young bird that is on its own now.  The juveniles have red on the tops of their heads for quite a while. 

 

Downy Woodpecker juvenile 7-6-17Downy Woodpecker juvenile 7-6-17  

 

Pollinators have been busy in the garden.  An unidentified fly was attracted to the Leather Flower vine (Clematis versicolor).

 

Fly species at Leather Flower (Clematis versicolor) 6-21-17Fly species at Leather Flower (Clematis versicolor) 6-21-17

 

Honeybees and bumblebees have been all over the 'White Dome' Hydrangea nativar (Hydrangea arborescens x White Dome).

 

Pollinators on Hydrangea arborescens x White Dome 6-26-17Pollinators on Hydrangea arborescens x White Dome 6-26-17

 

The lacily frilled Wild Bergamot or native Beebalm (Monarda fistulosa) is very attractive to bees, too.   

 

Bumblebee on Beebalm (Monarda fistulosa) 6-29-17Bumblebee on Beebalm (Monarda fistulosa) 6-29-17

 

Buttonbush (Cephalanthus occidentalis) brings in all kinds of pollinators, including Eastern Tiger Swallowtails.

 

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail and bumblebees on Buttonbush (Cephalanthus occidentalis) 6-29-17Eastern Tiger Swallowtail and bumblebees on Buttonbush (Cephalanthus occidentalis) 6-29-17

 

A species of dragonfly newly identified in our yard is this Swamp Darner, a female.  Typical to its description, it was in the shade hanging out on the moisture-loving Buttonbush (Cephalanthus occidentalis).

 

Swamp Darner female on Buttonbush (Cephalanthus occidentals) 6-29-17Swamp Darner female on Buttonbush (Cephalanthus occidentals) 6-29-17

 

This is the second year that we've seen the beautiful damselfly named the Ebony Jewelwing.  It likes to land on plants near the riffles in the stream bed like the Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia) and then retire to trees to rest overnight.

 

Ebony Jewelwing on Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia) 7-1-17Ebony Jewelwing on Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia) 7-1-17

 

The Familiar Bluets were found mating in the stream bed.  I've already seen some of their young tenerals nearby.

 

Familiar Bluets mating in pond 7-1-17Familiar Bluets mating in pond 7-1-17

 

Today, I saw at least 4 Blue Dashers chasing each other about the pond and displaying to each other.  This one shows the 'obelisk position'.  

 

Blue Dasher in obelisk position 7-8-17Blue Dasher in obelisk position 7-8-17

 

More babes to come, no doubt about it!

 

 


It's the Longest Day - Summer Solstice 6-21-17

June 21, 2017  •  Leave a Comment

Since the Winter Solstice six months ago, we have gained five hours and twenty-one minutes of daylight.

Enjoy this longest day! 

 

It has been rather eventful in surprising ways since the last post.  The first water lily bloom was opening when I fed the fish last Tuesday morning.  

 

First Water Lily 6-13-17First Water Lily 6-13-17

 

It was so hot and dry the next day that I finished early in the garden and came inside to do some chores.  I looked out the window about 3:00 and the water lilies looked like they had been pushed aside.  Curious, I checked the Pond Cam and I found this. 

 

Doe 6-14-17 2:30 pm

 

I had missed seeing the doe by minutes!  Since I had put a granular deer deterrent around the perimeter of the garden, the deer had not been feeding in there so much.  I also added bars of Irish Spring soap on stakes since they don't care for strong smells.  However, one of the bars had gotten chewed up, probably by a raccoon. It lasted like this for one more day, then disappeared.  Crazy!

 

  Irish Spring soap eaten by a raccoon?  6-16-17Irish Spring soap eaten by a raccoon? 6-16-17

 

Last Friday morning, my neighbor Peggy texted me about a discovery she found in a low spot in her yard with tall grass.  I went over with my camera.  It all made perfect sense now.

 

White-tailed Fawn 6-16-17White-tailed Fawn 6-16-17

 

Who can blame a mother for caring for her young?  The spotted fawns are too darned cute at this stage.  The truth is that the deer population is no longer naturally controlled.  Too many factors have upset that balance.  There are usually twins, but sometimes a doe will have just one.  

From there, I headed over to check on the Ruby-throated Hummingbird chicks.  It was pretty hot and breezy.  I had better luck getting video than stills.  I slowed down the mid-section to 25% speed to study the feeding process.  Amazing!

 

Ruby-throat Chicks 4 days old 6-16-17 (middle slowed to 1/4 speed)

 

The female feeds the young a regurgitated slurry of tiny insects and nectar.  Open a new page about it:  Ruby-throat

 

We finally got over an inch of rain and that cool-down.  I went back on Monday to check on the chicks again and they have grown.  Here are a few images.

 

6-19-17 Ruby-throated Hummingbird chicks 7 days old6-19-17 Ruby-throated Hummingbird chicks 7 days old 6-19-17 Ruby-throated Hummingbird chicks 7 days old6-19-17 Ruby-throated Hummingbird chicks 7 days old

6-19-17 Ruby-throated Hummingbird chicks 7 days old6-19-17 Ruby-throated Hummingbird chicks 7 days old

 

To view all of the Ruby-throated Hummingbird nest and chicks photos, look at this gallery:  Ruby-throated Hummingbird Nest

 

On other fronts, the female Three-toed Box Turtle has been seen on different days.  Hello!  Here she was at my feet in the woodland as i went to fill the feeder.

 

Three-toed Box Turtle, female 6-12-17Three-toed Box Turtle, female 6-12-17

 

The Indian Pinks (Spigelia marilandica) were gorgeous the first week of June, they have pretty much finished now. 

 

Gardenman Spider on Indian Pink (Spigelia marilandica) 6-2-17Gardenman Spider on Indian Pink (Spigelia marilandica) 6-2-17

 

The aquatic milkweed (Asclepias perennis) is in bloom now in the stream bed of the large pond.  It spent the winter in that same spot. 

 

Aquatic Milkweed (Asclepias perennis) 6-18-17Aquatic Milkweed (Asclepias perennis) 6-18-17

 

A very fresh looking Great Spangled Fritillary was seen nectaring at Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea).  The common blue violet (Viola sororia) is its host plant and we leave patches of violets to feed their caterpillars so we can see these beauties.  Dr. Doug Tallamy, well known scientist and author of Bringing Nature Home, has said that these butterflies have all but disappeared in the Eastern part of the country because there are no longer any violets left for them or the 28 other species of butterflies that lay eggs on them.  

 

Great Spangled Fritillary 6-15-17Great Spangled Fritillary 6-15-17

 

Wishing you all birds, bees and butterflies this summer!

 


Birding with my head down 6/13/17

June 13, 2017  •  Leave a Comment

In early May when I was photographing birds daily, I was asked in an email by a former neighbor, "How do you get anything done?????  Aren't you completely distracted in your thinking?????"  I smiled and shared these questions with my dear friend whom I had infected with the birding bug years ago.  These were her responses.

Answer to question 1:   Who cares?

Answer to question 2:   What?  Oh, look at that bird over there!!!!

We shared a good laugh.  Well, the piper must now be paid and days spent waiting for intermittent migrants, visiting family, reading Owl Babies to our blue-eyed boys and being otherwise engaged have turned to days spent working in the garden.  So, I am birding with my head down early in the mornings and hearing many of the nesting birds. They are not as vocal as when they were setting up their territories, but still call a bit in between forays of finding food.

On Tuesday, 6/2/17 we dug up a small beautyberry and moved it to another spot. This left a depression in the soil behind the bench in the garden. A couple days later, I was in the gazebo eating lunch when the Brown Thrasher family flew down into the garden.  There were four birds and they took turns dust-bathing in the area where the small plant had been.  I enjoyed seeing them, having not heard much at all from the male since mid-May.  The male then called to gather his brood and they flew off together up into the neighbor's oak trees. It was still a bit bittersweet not to get a photo of that kind of interaction.  In fact, I've gotten very few photos of that species.  The last time was in 2006!  So, perhaps one can use his or her imagination and put these two images together. 

 

Brown Thrasher 4-28-06Brown Thrasher 4-28-06

Dust bathing area behind bench 6-4-17Dust bathing area behind bench 6-4-17

 

Or not.  I know, it's just not the same.  A wise instructor once told me, "Well, you may not see that again, but you will see other things!"  As luck would have it, I had just taken the bench photo when to my delight, a bird popped up from the garden.  It was another nester, a Great Crested Flycatcher! 

 

Great Crested Flycatcher 6-4-17Great Crested Flycatcher 6-4-17 Great Crested Flycatcher 6-4-17Great Crested Flycatcher 6-4-17 Great Crested Flycatcher 6-4-17Great Crested Flycatcher 6-4-17

 

This species is usually found at the top of a tree calling, "Breeep, breeep, breeep!"  I didn't expect to see this one foraging so low, but insects are found in every level of the canopy.  I saw the bird again yesterday perched on the arbor and flying out and back catching insects.  They have such beautiful and distinctive coloration, don't they?

Great Crested Flycatcher

There have been other opportunities in the last week to document nesters in friends' yards.  I visited the first nest on Wednesday, 6/7/17.  It is a Ruby-throated Hummingbird nest that is located just above eye level in a young Bur Oak (Quercus macrocarpa).  The nest is spun with spider silk to stretch with growing chicks and camouflaged with bits of lichen.  "The details of life are exquisite!"  Have you found it?  Look closely at the images to see the spider silk.

 

6-7-17 Ruby-throated Hummingbird nest in Bur Oak (Quercus macrocarpa)6-7-17 Ruby-throated Hummingbird nest in Bur Oak (Quercus macrocarpa) 6-7-17 Ruby-throated Hummingbird nest in Bur Oak (Quercus macrocarpa)6-7-17 Ruby-throated Hummingbird nest in Bur Oak (Quercus macrocarpa) 6-7-17 Ruby-throated Hummingbird nest in Bur Oak (Quercus macrocarpa)6-7-17 Ruby-throated Hummingbird nest in Bur Oak (Quercus macrocarpa)

 

We're not sure when the bird laid eggs, but as of Monday 6/12/17, it had begun feeding two chicks. So, I went back today and despite the wind and a noisy garbage truck coming down the street as the female came in, I was able to get some images of her feeding the babes. This period of the nestling phase will last an average of 18-23 days, and up to another week longer. 

 

6-13-17 Ruby-throated Hummingbird lands to feed chicks6-13-17 Ruby-throated Hummingbird lands to feed chicks 6-13-17 Ruby-throated Hummingbird feeds chicks6-13-17 Ruby-throated Hummingbird feeds chicks 6-13-17 Ruby-throated Hummingbird feeds chicks6-13-17 Ruby-throated Hummingbird feeds chicks

 

I am very grateful to these folks for allowing me to witness this natural event and photograph the birds.  Though we have 3 females coming in regularly to feed in our yard, they fly off in different directions and I have not located a nest closer by.  I will be checking on these chicks as they continue to grow. 

 

Open a new tab by clicking here to learn more about the bird and its nesting habits:  Ruby-throated Hummingbird

This page gives even more descriptive information:  Ruby-throated Hummingbird on hummingbirds.net

 

As soon as I got home after getting those initial photos last week, a second friend called to give me the particulars of the Red-shouldered Hawks' nest he could see from his deck.  I went the next morning.  The nest was in the largest crotch of an American Sycamore (Platanus occidentalis).  These hawks prefer nesting near a water source and this tree was situated along the bank of a creek.

 

6-9-17 Red-shouldered Hawk nest in American Sycamore (Platanus occidentals)6-9-17 Red-shouldered Hawk nest in American Sycamore (Platanus occidentals)

 

The three young hawks were just days from fledging and leaving the nest.  One of the adults (its wing seen on the left side of the tree) brought in a small mammal for them to eat.  

 

6-9-17 Red-shouldered Hawk adult brings shrew to juveniles6-9-17 Red-shouldered Hawk adult brings shrew to juveniles

 

Studying the photos, I could confirm that the prey was a Short-tailed Shrew, smaller than a mouse.  The young bird seemed pretty cautious about handling it.

 

6-9-17 Red-shouldered Hawk juvenile with short-tailed shrew6-9-17 Red-shouldered Hawk juvenile with short-tailed shrew

 

The two young birds seemed to be waiting for it to stop moving before getting into their meal.

  6-9-17 Red-shouldered Hawk juveniles look at shrew6-9-17 Red-shouldered Hawk juveniles look at shrew 6-9-17 Red-shouldered Hawk juvenile tries to eat  shrew6-9-17 Red-shouldered Hawk juvenile tries to eat shrew

 

After a bit of research, i learned that the Short-tailed Shrew is the only mammal in North America with a poisonous bite! Perhaps that is why the young birds were a bit reticent.  

Read more about the shrew and watch a National Geographic video at this link:    

Short-tailed Shrew

 

Here's the link with interesting details about the hawks:  Red-shouldered Hawk

 

One last thing, the Sustainable Backyard Tour was last Sunday.  I visited several gardens and always enjoy seeing the creative ways that people garden with native plants to help birds and pollinators, as well as re-use and re-cycle different things into fun yard art.  Here are a few examples.

 

A two-acre prairie of native plants established in 1999.

6-11-17 Sustainable Backyard Tour #46-11-17 Sustainable Backyard Tour #4

 

Happy and productive bees return to their hives after work in the prairie garden.

 

6-11-17 Sustainable Backyard Tour #46-11-17 Sustainable Backyard Tour #4

 

A female Eastern Tiger Swallowtail nectars on Orange Butterflyweed (Asclepias tuberosa) in the prairie garden.

 

6-11-17 Sustainable Backyard Tour #46-11-17 Sustainable Backyard Tour #4

 

Driftwood that has all been cut by beavers near the Missouri River was collected and painted by the gardener-artist in another native garden.

 

6-11-17 Sustainable Backyard Tour #396-11-17 Sustainable Backyard Tour #39

 

A galvanized re-cycled boy was found climbing a tree!

 

6-11-17 Sustainable Backyard Tour #396-11-17 Sustainable Backyard Tour #39

 

Rain and a cool down is in the forecast and it can't come soon enough for me!